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Radon Could Be A Hidden Threat In Your Home

June 20, 2017 • Bill Wellock

Realtor Debra Harris had found just what her client wanted. A duplex on Morgan Street in Throop was remodeled, in move-in condition and at a price she could afford. It checked all her boxes for an investment property. But when the home inspection came back, there was an issue: radon. A walk through the home wouldn’t show any sign of the odorless, colorless gas that comes from the decay of uranium. The gas causes lung cancer and is the primary cause of the cancer among people who don’t smoke, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Luzerne and Lackawanna counties, and most counties in Pennsylvania, are in the EPA’s highest zone for highest potential for unhealthy radon levels. “She was going to have tenants in there, so she definitely needed that addressed,” Harris said. The seller wound up installing a radon mitigation system to close the deal. As Harris remembers, it cost about $2,500.

High Levels of Radon Found in Some Wells Across Pennsylvania

June 8, 2017 • U.S. Geological Survey

A new U.S. Geological Survey study has discovered high levels of radon in wells across certain areas of Pennsylvania. The study, which was conducted in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Departments of Health and Environmental Protection, examined 1,041 well samples and found that 14 percent had radon levels at or above the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed alternative maximum contaminant level of 4,000 picocuries per liter. While the EPA does not currently regulate radon in drinking water, it has proposed this alternative limit for public water supplies in states like Pennsylvania, which has an EPA-approved radon indoor air quality program. For states without an approved program, the EPA has proposed a lower, more protective, maximum contaminant level of 300 picocuries per liter.

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