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Build Local Infrastructure for Effective Program Delivery

Testable Ideas

  • Recruit community partners that are trusted for their scientific and health expertise
    • Offer financial support, materials, and other resources to bring partners to the table
  • Listen to local ideas—allow community expertise to influence program strategy
    • Invite local experts, such as public health officials, tribal leaders, AARST members, cooperative extension staff, and others, to your planning table

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • AL regularly convenes extension agents to discuss the best ways to implement the program statewide. "We give 90% of our SIRG dollars to extension so their input and ownership is essential. The result [of the regular meetings] is more effective education and greater job satisfaction."
  • 90% of WI's SIRG dollars go to 16 local Radon Information Centers (RICs) and to mini-grants. RICs, which are run by certified testing and mitigation experts, field geographically-routed calls from a 1-800 number; provide low-cost test kits; follow-up on high test results; recruit local mitigators; and track results. "Local public health has unique expertise about how to reach people, what messages matter and to whom. They have better outreach skills than state people or consulting firms because it's based on local experience."

Testable Ideas

  • Encourage local partners to pilot-test program approaches
  • Recognize local leadership and publicly celebrate partners' success
  • Put local partners in front of the public, industry representatives, and state officials to talk about goals and plans

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • At a biennial radon meeting for industry and public health, WI recognizes particularly successful local programs to share their lessons for success and goals for the future.
  • WI empowers RICs to lead. One result: the RICs produced a map of certified mitigators and recruited new mitigators to meet public needs. "When they first made the maps, mitigators were only in the highly populated areas, but now they're all over the state because of the RIC's efforts. They do what it takes to promote public health and when they saw that required more certified mitigators, they created an industry."
  • PA learned that good ideas often come from the grassroots. "One of our most successful programs came out of a mini-grant: the newborn program to get maternity wards to provide new moms with information about testing homes for radon. We now have more than 70 hospitals participating and see a good return with many new parents testing and mitigating high radon levels."

Testable Ideas

  • Make it easy for local partners and state staff to communicate regularly through meetings, newsletters, listservs, etc.
  • Encourage continual discussion of effective outreach strategies, ways to overcome common challenges, and joint planning for media outreach, industry partnerships, results tracking, National Radon Action Month (NRAM), etc.

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • AL's state coordinator captures activity information from extension agents in a quarterly newsletter for all offices; and convenes a Radon Advisory Committee (RAC) of state staff and staff from a rotating group of extension offices each quarter to discuss how to run the program, organize NRAM events, develop educational materials, and more. "Our best ideas come from brainstorming with them. The RAC gives local agents a window into state-level program deliberations and improves two-way communications."
  • WI convenes state, RIC and other local health staff twice per year, including one meeting every December to plan for NRAM.