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Design a Results-Driven Program

Testable Ideas

  • Establish a baseline of program performance against which you can track your progress
  • Refine your program implementation over time based on your data
  • Use technology to simplify data collection, analysis and management

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • PA is developing a web interface to streamline results reporting: testers and mitigators will access the database online, including through their PDAs.
  • AL fine tunes program strategy based on impact results data that compares test kit sales to actual usage. Results helped AL discover that displaying zip code maps at local home shows, offering radon test kits via their web site, and providing community group presentations were all more effective tactics than sending radon information home on the first day of school, so AL shifted their resources and focus.

    For more on the AL questionnaires, click here…

    “We convinced several labs to include a card with the radon testing equipment that asked users to report what caused them to test. There was a code for each type of outreach we conducted. Because we know how many pieces of information we started with at each event, how many test kit certificates were distributed and how many were redeemed, and how many test kits were used, that gives us several useful data points. We now know that anything over 30% is a good usage number for an activity. For example, 39% of the test kits we promoted through our oncology outreach program were deployed, but a relatively low number of them discovered high radon levels; 20% of the tests resulting from our newborn program (modeled on PA’s maternity ward outreach program) show high radon levels; and about 50% of the tests distributed through home shows are deployed and 26% of those lead to the detection of high radon levels.”

  • NJ uses data provided by testers and mitigators to target outreach to homes with high radon levels that haven't been mitigated and uses DCA data to promote risk reduction. "The data from DCA is great because it lets us target our outreach specifically to people who live in new homes that we know were built with RRNC."

Testable Ideas

  • Get creative to collect data--train local partners to collect it, forge alliances with industry for voluntary reporting, work with schools and universities, etc.
  • Provide incentives, such as public recognition, to encourage partners to collect data

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • AL recruited labs willing to include a specialized datasheet in radon test kits. AL designed a datasheet to gather information on who performs test, the type of tests, type of foundation, whether homes have active or passive systems, and what led people to test for radon The labs willing to partner with AL to provide the data got good publicity on AL's web site.
  • WI requires grantees to examine surveillance data for homes with elevated radon, keep records of tests conducted with agency assistance, and follow cases of elevated exposure to promote mitigation by working with labs that will report results to the tester and the agency
  • NJ teams with Rutgers University to analyze new home construction and radon testing data to assess how many RRNC homeowners activate their mitigation systems and conduct post-tests of their radon levels.

Testable Ideas

  • Name the results you’re after, establish metrics for tracking progress, and share your goals and measures so everyone knows how to measure success

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • In the RFPs for radon grant dollars, WI sets out its long-term program goal—the reduction in lung cancer incidence due to radon—and output measures for tracking progress—the number of homes tested and those with levels over 4 pCi/L that are mitigated.