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Cultivate Effective Relationships with Industry

Testable Ideas

  • Create open communication with industry by being very visible
    • Get involved with industry groups, attend and convene meetings with industry, read and write for trade journals, etc.
  • Work with industry to build the supply and demand for RRNC homes
    • Ask them what they need and show that you want to help
  • Communicate with a unified voice
    • Coordinate your message and strategy before public appearances
    • Avoid public disagreement which feeds doubt about radon risks and control strategies

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • IL and industry partners educate the public by presenting a unified message. “We don’t criticize each other publicly. Public debate just leaves people confused. We have conference calls and meetings before public statements and appearances to make sure we’re all pulling in the same direction.”
  • "Industry folks are in the field every day. [PA] works with them as much as we can. Our approach shows that we want them to succeed and the more they work with us the less likely they are to face mandatory action. We build relationships by admitting that industry partners have something to teach us and asking for their advice."
  • PA keeps radon on industry's radar by, for example, writing articles for the builder's association magazine. "They featured our story in an article that describes RRNC and says that the Builders Association sees the value in it and will not oppose it. That's a really big win for us."
  • WI hosts a radon conference every other year that attracts a large industry audience. "Though we may not always agree, by convening this event we keep in touch and make sure everyone has a chance to be heard." WI's leaders also participate in online trade group discussions, such as the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) message boards.

Testable Ideas

  • Describe how your work can profit testers, mitigators, and builders and enlist them to help you succeed
    • Consider industry as a partner in public education, media outreach, data gathering (e.g. conducting homeowner surveys), etc.
  • Help certified industry prosper
    • Train testers, mitigators and builders; promote 'the good guys'; share the latest science and technology innovations; and provide talking points, marketing messages and materials they can use to attract customers
  • Problem solve with your industry partners
    • Listen to industry’s needs and be responsive to them

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • IL needs data but licensees say reporting can be difficult. IL shows licensees why data reporting benefits them and makes it as easy as possible to report data. “We only ask for data that we need; demonstrate the benefit of providing data by showing how we use it for public outreach which helps them grow their business; let licensees report when it works for them; and offer a CEU course on how to use Excel to track and report data.”
  • "We can go to township trainings for builders and share data from the Analyzer [PA's database] that breaks the radon risk down by zip code and shows the probabilities and statistics of radon in each area. We make it personal during those trainings and give builders local numbers and messages to help them market RRNC."
  • WI lists certified industry members on its web site and promotes certified vendors through RIC and local health agencies. WI also supports 'the good guys' by giving them data that demonstrates the radon risks to customers. "Though there is no regulation that says you must be certified, between the close relationships with the state and industry and the activities of the RICs, we have created a lot of competition for people who aren't certified."
  • AL motivated builders "by using test results to identify zip codes with high radon risk and sharing information with builders in those areas. A builder incorporated RRNC so we made promotional signs for his houses that said 'this home is radon safe'. The builder did the right thing; we wanted to draw attention to that."