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Maximize the Impact of Your Outreach

Testable Ideas

  • Recruit trusted sources of information to endorse and distribute your messages
    • Consider: universities and research institutes, lung cancer victims and their families, health care and public health experts, etc.
  • Help your audience understand the seriousness of radon risks by partnering with health care representatives to deliver messages
    • Consider: home visit nurses, oncologists, primary care providers, etc., as messengers
  • Train industry insiders to deliver radon messages to their peers

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • AL encourages its certified mitigators and testers to help promote radon education at home shows, public meetings and civic group presentations. "The certified professionals gain exposure while providing expert and technical support to our program."
  • PA partners with local real estate associations and builder associations to provide radon testing, mitigation, and RRNC trainings for their members.
  • AL partnered with oncologists to distribute information about radon risks and provide coupons for test kits for patients: 38% of kits distributed through oncologists’ offices were deployed.
  • During NRAM, NJ works with county cancer coalitions, the Lung Cancer Circle of Hope, and county smoking cessation programs to deliver radon informational lectures at local venues.

Testable Ideas

  • Help your audience understand the risk by delivering information that is vivid, concrete and personal
    • Talk about local rather than national statistics and risk
    • Compare radon to familiar risks like x-rays or smoking; avoid unfamiliar risks like lightning strikes
    • Personalize the threat with stories from people who share your audiences' social and economic characteristics
  • Highlight the loss or harm that can result from inaction, such as negative effect on property values, cancer and death

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • At home shows, AL uses a huge color-coded zip code map. “The map draws people like flies because it brings radon close to them…to their neighborhood. We use it as an outreach tool. People stop to look at their zip code and when they’re looking we start talking. They almost always purchase a test kit if their home is in 25% or greater probability zip code area…We also provide zip code maps to city councils in high radon counties and use the map in our fact sheets.”
  • NJ always thinks of new ways to make radon messages vibrant. Recently, NJ began emphasizing that radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers. "Some people don't like it, but we have seen that it's a powerful message that gets attention, so we're going for it."
  • WI advises RICs to give the media stories with local flavor. "A press release from local experts that speaks to local concerns will get published. Locally sourced and cited information reaches more people than state outreach."

Testable Ideas

  • Provide clear directions on what to do when radon levels test high
    • Consider peer modeling of the decision to mitigate
    • Demonstrate the positive consequences of mitigation
  • Advise your audience on ways to manage the costs of mitigation
  • Provide information on how to select qualified mitigators
    • Promote effective mitigations by encouraging follow-up testing

Expand / CollapseStrategies in Action

  • NJ counsels schools to use RRNC in new buildings or additions to reduce potential costs of mitigation if elevated radon levels are later discovered.
  • The 16 RICs that support WI offer local access to technical expertise on radon testing and mitigation: at least one staff person at every RIC is certified for measurement, mitigation and contracting. When the public calls 888-LOW-RADON, they are geographically routed to their closest RIC where they can find technical experts, access lists of local testers and mitigators, and hear examples of how their neighbors have managed high radon levels.