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Radon in the News

Danbury Offering Free Radon Testing to Residents

The Danbury Health and Human Services Department will be providing free radon testing kits for Danbury residents on a first come, first serve basis. Free radon testing is part of an ongoing city initiative to work with residents in keeping our community safe and healthy.

Radon in homes is the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Radon is a naturally-occurring radioactive gas that forms when uranium decays is found in rocks, soil and water. The gas is invisible and has no smell, making it an elusive “silent killer” if it’s not specifically tested for. It’s believed that radon gas exposure is responsible for 21,000 lung cancer deaths in the United States each year and the City of Danbury is being proactive in offering free radon testing kits.

Continue reading and find out more here.

EPA Grant Helps Protect Vermont Residents From Radon Exposure

BOSTON - The state of Vermont has received $105,000 that will support efforts to reduce exposure and health risks of radon found in buildings and schools.

The Vermont Department of Health received funds to provide long term test kits for homeowners, and to promote radon-resistant construction techniques in new buildings and renovations. The project will also offer technical assistance for assessing and reducing radon in schools.

The State of Vermont matches the federal award with 40 percent state funding to support actions in the state's approved work plan.

Continue reading here.

National Radon Action Plan Added to RadonLeaders.org

Radonleaders.org now has a section dedicated to the national radon action plan (NRAP). The NRAP is a strategy for saving lives coordinating the actions of three federal departments and nine national organizations.

It highlights progress in addition to describing strategies to reduce radon risk. Click NRAP for more information.

Radon Poster Contest Gets Underway

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah students are urged to help increase awareness of radon by participating in the 2017 National Radon Poster Contest.

Radon is a naturally occurring, invisible and odorless gas that can enter homes through cracks in the basement floor or from well water. According to the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, 1 in 3 Utah homes have elevated levels of radon, which has been linked to lung cancer.

The contest is being held in partnership with the DEQ, the Utah Department of Health, the Utah Cancer Action Network and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Children ages 9-18 are eligible to participate. Participants will compete in three categories: grades four through six; grades seven through nine; and grades 10 thought 12.

Read more here.

Radon Awareness

Radon, a cancer causing, colorless, odorless gas kills up to 20,000 people around the country each year. Here in Wyoming all counties but two are in the high risk zone for radon levels, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

I looked into what this actually means and what we can do to protect ourselves as winter approaches.

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Radon Poster Contest for Colorado Students

From Colorado Radon: The 2018 National Radon Poster Contest is now open, giving Colorado students 9 to 14 years old a chance to educate communities about indoor radon risks, win cash prizes and have their artwork distributed across the state or country.

The contest, which closes Nov. 30, 2017, is coordinated by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. It is designed to raise awareness about radon testing and to inform people of the danger of radon in their homes. Posters are first entered in the Colorado contest, with the winning poster representing Colorado in the national contest.

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Q&A: “Should I test for radon if the home already has a radon mitigation system?”

When a home already has an active radon mitigation system, is it even worth testing for radon? That's a great question. To answer that, allow me to share a quick story.

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Test your home for radon to save money, your life

FAIRBANKS — What did it cost you last time you went to the doctor or dentist? I mean before insurance, Medicare or Medicaid kicked in to bring down the cost. And that may have been just for a routine checkup or work/school annual physical. What if you needed treatment for lung cancer?

The National Cancer Institute reports the cost for the initial treatment of lung cancer in 2010 was $60,553 for women and $60,885 for men. Subsequent annual continued treatment was $8,130 and $7,591 respectively. The problem with this cancer is not only treatment expenditures, but also of survival. According to the America Cancer Society, most lung cancers have spread widely and are in advanced stages when they are first found.

But what if a simple test could alert you to the presence of the second leading cause of lung cancer — radon? Certified professionals will give you a detailed hourly average of radon levels in your home with sophisticated machinery for a couple hundred dollars.

New Tech Protects Homes from Invisible Radon Threat

You don’t have to smoke to get lung cancer. If you’re unlucky and don’t take precautions, all you have to do is breathe the air in your home.

Radon — a colorless and odorless radioactive gas found in soil — causes more than 21,000 deaths from lung cancer every year in the U.S. — more than carbon monoxide and house fires combined. Released from rock, soil and water, the uranium-derived gas can reach dangerous levels in even the best-built homes.

Read more here.

Medical and Health Groups Endorse the National Radon Action Plan

Some of the nation’s leading medical and health groups have officially declared their support of the National Radon Action Plan. The American Thoracic Society, the American Public Health Association, the Asthma and Allergy Network and Trust for America’s Health have all signed on to the goals and strategies in the plan. They have been encouraged to share this with their members and to join in actions to support the implementation of the plan.