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Radon in the News

Some unseen effects of extreme cold

Extreme cold can have unusual effects in some unusual places. It can cause more radon gas to enter homes, and it can kill off tree pests. MPR's Cathy Wurzer spoke first with Bill Angell, professor, and housing specialist at the University of Minnesota, about radon. Then, she spoke with Lee Frelich, who studies forests and is Director of the Center for Hardwood Ecology at the University of Minnesota, about tree pests.

http://minnesota.publicradio.org/display/web/2009/01/15/cold/

Call for Papers

Call for Papers
19th National Radon Training Meeting
Sept 20-23, 2009, St. Louis, Missouri

The E-25 Committee on Radon needs your help in identifying topics for sessions and training, including speakers, that would be of interest to the state radon programs. Early planning is needed so that we can provide you, the state radon workers, and other interested parties with early information about the content of the meeting.

Blogs Come To RadonLeaders.org!

Blogs Come To RadonLeaders.org!

Blogs have come to RadonLeaders.org! The blogs will feature content from members of the RadonLeaders.org community. We have five blogs up already, on topics ranging from NRAM outreach to radon activist's personal stories. Read and comment on them now at www.radonleaders.org/discuss/blogs!

Any member of RadonLeaders.org can blog Have an opinion or a topic you think the RadonLeaders.org community would be interested in hearing? Post a blog, it's really easy!

To Blog:
-Log in to RadonLeaders.org
-Select Create Content
-Then select Blog Entry and start writing

Radon: still bad - and getting worse

Despite nation’s 20-year war on cancerous gas found in soil, more homes than ever unsafe.

Remember radon?

Not enough people do, according to a new federal government report that says more people than ever are living in homes with the cancer-causing gas.

Studies have found Pennsylvania — where the radon scare originated in 1984 — with some of the most elevated levels of the naturally occurring gas in the U.S., and Lancaster County with some of the highest pockets in the Commonwealth.

A 2005 study, cited as the most comprehensive yet on radon findings in the U.S., found that six southcentral Pennsylvania counties, including Lancaster, had the highest average radon levels in the country.

Read More

Radon is a silent killer

On Feb. 8, 2006, Gloria Linnertz, of Waterloo, Ill., lost her husband, Joe, to lung cancer.

That same day, Joe became a statistic — he was one of more than 21,000 people who die each year of radon-induced lung cancer in the United States.

"He led a very healthy lifestyle," said Gloria, who is vice president of the national group Cancer Survivors Against Radon. "When we asked the oncologist how he could have gotten lung cancer, he said, 'Smoking,' but Joe hadn't smoked in 27 years.

Read More

Another Gas Hike

A study released this week shows 42% of homes tested in Illinois have excess levels of radon. Radon is colorless, odorless and tasteless. But, it's considered the number one cause of lung cancer for non-smokers. And, it's in abundance across this area.

Here's a reason to get out of your house this winter. A study released this week shows 42% of homes tested in Illinois have excess levels of radon. Radon is colorless, odorless and tasteless. But, it's considered the number one cause of lung cancer for non-smokers. And, it's in abundance across this area. Nearly 72-thousand homes were tested for the gas between 2003 and 2007. And, the state lists nine local counties where more than half the tested homes need to be treated for high radon levels.

Read More

10 "New" Reasons to Test Your Home For Radon

We have an “old” reason to test our homes for radon. Radon (found in all 50 states and around the world) is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers. And we have an emotional reason. The wife of “superman,” Dana Reeve left us far too early, leaving behind an orphaned son, and a cause without her voice. Statistically as a never smoker, radon is the prime suspect in her death.

But if I can’t play on your emotions, and if you, like me, have already found your new years resolutions to be too much work, try this.

Test your home for radon because:

1. It doesn’t take any willpower.
2. You can do it once (or twice) and forget about it for a long, long time.
3. If the level is abnormal, it’s not your fault.

Read More

Research: Radon-induced Lung Cancer Deaths and the Cost Effectiveness and Potential of Policies to Reduce Them

Research: Radon-induced Lung Cancer Deaths and the Cost Effectiveness and Potential of Policies to Reduce Them

Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them

Alastair Gray, professor of health economics, Simon Read, analyst and programmer, Paul McGale, statistician, Sarah Darby, professor of medical statistics

1 Health Economics Research Centre, Department of Public Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF, 2 Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, University of Oxford

Correspondence to: A Gray alastair.gray@dphpc.ox.ac.uk

Full Published Article: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/338/jan06_1/a3110

Objective
To determine the number of deaths from lung cancer related to radon in the home and to explore the cost effectiveness of alternative policies to control indoor radon and their potential to reduce lung cancer mortality.

Design
Cost effectiveness analysis.

HUD Healthy Homes Conference Presentations Now Available

HUD Healthy Homes Conference Presentations Now Available

The presentations from the 2008 National Healthy Homes Conference: Building a Framework for Healthy Housing are now available on line at www.hud.gov/offices/lead/NHHC/index.cfm.

January is National Radon Action Month

January is National Radon Action Month

January is National Radon Action Month, a time when radon professionals, public health professionals, state leaders, and others take action to raise awareness about radon and educate people in their communities to reduce their risk from exposure to radon. In January, stakeholders throughout the nation conduct outreach and host events to raise awareness, reduce risk, and save lives.

RadonLeaders.org National Radon Action Month Features:

  • Webinar on using the Radon Change Package to amplify your results to be held on January 6, 2009. For more information view the Webinar listing in the Community Calendar. Register Now!
    UPDATE: Webinar Screencast (audio/video) is now available. Watch the Webinar now!