RadonLeaders.org
Skip top navigation

Radon Research

Radon Research is a resource featuring scientific papers and presentations on radon-related research.

Occupational Radon Exposure and Lung Cancer Mortality: Estimating Intervention Effects Using the Parametric g-Formula

Occupational Radon Exposure and Lung Cancer Mortality: Estimating Intervention Effects Using the Parametric g-Formula

Authors: JK Edwards, LJ McGrath, JP Buckley, MK Schubauer-Berigan, SR Cole, and DB Richardson

Epidemiology, 2014 September 4

View the abstract here:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25192403

Abstract:

BACKGROUND:Traditional regression analysis techniques used to estimate associations between occupational radon exposure and lung cancer focus on estimating the effect of cumulative radon exposure on lung cancer. In contrast, public health interventions are typically based on regulating radon concentration rather than workers' cumulative exposure. Estimating the effect of cumulative occupational exposure on lung cancer may be difficult in situations vulnerable to the healthy worker survivor bias.

Categories:

Rain-induced increase in background radiation detected by Radiation Portal Monitors

Rain-induced increase in background radiation detected by Radiation Portal Monitors

Authors: RJ Livesay, CS Blessinger, TF Guzzardo, and PA Hausladen

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 2014 July 21

View the abstract here:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25062116

Abstract:

Categories:

Comparative Dosimetry of Radon in Mines and Homes

Comparative Dosimetry of Radon in Mines and Homes

Author: National Research Council (US) Panel on Dosimetric Assumptions Affecting the Application of Radon Risk Estimates

Read the full online resource here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK234227/.

From the resource:

Studies of underground miners have provided a wealth of data about the risk of lung cancer from exposure to radon's progeny elements, but the application of the miner data to the home environment is not straightforward.

Categories:

Review of Radiological Data Measured in the Polycythemia Vera Investigation Study Area in Carbon, Luzerne and Schuylkill Counties, Pennsylvania

Review of Radiological Data Measured in the Polycythemia Vera Investigation Study Area in Carbon, Luzerne and Schuylkill Counties, Pennsylvania

Author: The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

Read the full online report here: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BwRH4EmO-HCtcWliYjNFeEhadjg/edit .

Report Summary:

This study by the CDC's Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry was a result of ongoing research into the cause of an unusually high number of local Pennsylvanians diagnosed with a rare form of blood cancer called polycythemia vera.

Categories:

A Noble Gas Cage

A Noble Gas Cage

Author: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Read the full online resource here: http://www.labmanager.com/news/2014/07/a-noble-gas-cage?fw1pk=2#.U-zbQ_ldVAp.

From the article:

When nuclear fuel gets recycled, the process releases radioactive krypton and xenon gases. Naturally occurring uranium in rock contaminates basements with the related gas radon. A new porous material called CC3 effectively traps these gases, and research appearing July 20 in Nature Materials shows how: by breathing enough to let the gases in but not out.

Categories:

Material Can Extract Radon, Radioactive Elements From Air And Water

Material Can Extract Radon, Radioactive Elements From Air And Water

Author: Scientific Blogging

Read the full online resource here: http://www.science20.com/news_articles/material_can_extract_radon_radioactive_elements_from_air_and_water-140902.

From the article:

An 'organic cage molecule' called CC3 has been found to separate krypton, radon and xenon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million.

Categories:

Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages.

Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

Authors: Chen L, Reiss PS, Chong SY, Holden D, Jelfs KE, Hasell T, Little MA, Kewley A, Briggs ME, Stephenson A, Thomas KM, Armstrong JA, Bell J, Busto J, Noel R, Liu J, Strachan DM, Thallapally PK, Cooper AI

Nature Materials, 2014 Jul 20

Read the abstract here:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25038731

Abstract:

Categories:

Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2005-2011

Radon Control Activities for Lung Cancer Prevention in National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program Plans, 2005-2011

Authors: Neri, A., Stewart, S., Angell, W. (2013)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research, Practice, and Policy, Volume 10, 1-9.

Read the full article: http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2013/pdf/12_0337.pdf

Abstract
Introduction

Misconceptions about Declining Lung Cancer Incidence in Ex-Smokers

Peto, J. (2011). That lung cancer incidence falls in ex-smokers: misconceptions 2. British Journal of Cancer, 104(3): 389.

Abstract
Misconceptions and ill-founded theories can arise in all areas of science. However, the apparent accessibility of many epidemiology findings and popular interest in the subject can lead to additional misunderstandings. The article below continues an occasional series of short editorials highlighting some current misinterpretations of epidemiological findings. Invited authors will be given wide scope in judging the prevalence of the misconception under discussion. We hope that this series will prove instructive to cancer researchers in other disciplines as well as to students of epidemiology.

NIH study offers insight into why cancer incidence increases with age

The accumulation of age-associated changes in a biochemical process that helps control genes may be responsible for some of the increased risk of cancer seen in older people, according to a National Institutes of Health study.

Scientists have known for years that age is a leading risk factor for the development of many types of cancer, but why aging increases cancer risk remains unclear. Researchers suspect that DNA methylation, or the binding of chemical tags, called methyl groups, onto DNA, may be involved. Methyl groups activate or silence genes, by affecting interactions between DNA and the cell’s protein-making machinery.