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January

Time to Test for Radon

If you haven’t tested your home for radon recently, now’s a good time.

Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that forms naturally when radioactive metals break down in rocks, soil and groundwater. January is National Radon Awareness Month. Winter is a good time to test your home, Teton County Public Health Department response coordinator Rachael Wheeler said.

“The reason winter is a better time to test is because your house is closed up already,” she said. “If you test in the summer, we tell people you need to do things like have all your windows shut, not use your fan and shut your doors as quickly as possible. It’s an easier time to test than the summer months.”

Short-term radon detection kits are available for $10 at Teton County Environmental Health in the public health building at 460 E. Pearl Ave. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

National Radon Action Month: Spreading awareness

You can't see it, smell it, or taste it in your home but there may be dangerous levels or radon lurking in your house.

About twenty-one thousand Americans die each year from lung cancer caused from radon. The month of January is National Radon Action month and the EPA and U.S. Surgeon General are encouraging everyone to test their homes, businesses, and schools.

"I see a lot of people with cancer. Probably once every two weeks I'm in somebody's home that has had cancer and don't have an explanation for it, in particular lung cancer and have come to find out that their radons high," said Kevin Siers, owner of KSA Radon Services.

Other prevention techniques the EPA is promoting this month are spreading the word and attending a radon awareness event in our area.

Learn more about how you can raise awareness!

January A Good Time to Test for Radon

The second leading cause of lung cancer is an odorless, invisible and radioactive gas that can seep into homes through the soil and kills 21,000 Americans each year — radon.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has designated January as National Radon Action Month, during which people should test their homes for radon and learn about the substance.

“Sixty-three percent of homes in North Dakota test over the action level (for radon),” said Marcie Bota, environmental health practitioner for Central Valley Health District. “… this can happen in any home.”

The “action level” — the point at which corrective action should be taken — for radon is 4 pico-Curies per liter, and every single county in North Dakota has a high potential for elevated levels of radon, according to the North Dakota Department of Health.

EPA Calls for Radon Action this January

EPA Calls for Radon Action this January

The World Health Organization and Environmental Protection Agency have announced a call to action for Americans to test their homes for Radon Gas, which has recently been identified as the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers in the U.S.

The EPA has officially designated January 2011 to be National Radon Action Month in the United States. The press, local health departments, and the media are encouraged to help save lives in 2011 by promoting National Radon Action Month.

Radon is a naturally-occurring, radioactive gas that seeps out of the ground and can enter homes and other buildings. Since Radon is invisible and odorless, the only way to know if a home has dangerous levels of the gas is to conduct a Radon test. Radon problems have been found in every county of the U.S. so the Surgeon General is recommending that all homes are tested.

What are you planning for National Radon Action Month in January?

Holding ceremony recognizing local champions
3% (1 vote)
Promoting the new Green Sox PSA to local media
19% (6 votes)
Sponsoring a booth at a health fair, home show, library, etc.
32% (10 votes)
Asking Mayor/City Council/Governor to pass NRAM proclamation
16% (5 votes)
All of the above and more!
29% (9 votes)
Total votes: 31