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Dangerous Radon Can’t Be Seen or Tasted

How does Radon get into your home? Radon gets in through:

  • Cracks in solid floors.
  • Construction joints.
  • Cracks in walls.
  • Gaps in suspended floors.
  • Gaps around service pipes.
  • Cavities inside walls.
  • The water supply.

Radon is a radioactive gas. It comes from the natural decay of uranium that is found in nearly all soils. It typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation.

Your home traps Radon inside, where it can build up. Any home may have a Radon problem. This means new and old homes, well sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements.

Continue reading here.

What is radon, and why is it dangerous?

The action level for radon, the level where the health risk warrants fixing, is 4 picocuries per liter of air (pCi/l). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that one in 15 homes nationwide has an elevated level of radon (a level at or above the action level), while one in four homes tested in Nevada has an elevated radon level.

Because Nevada lacks any regulations that protect citizens from radon, the first step toward risk-reduction occurs through education. The second step is to test, as testing is the only way to determine a home or building's radon level.

Additionally, a home should be tested every two years, before or after remodeling and after significant seismic activity.

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