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Notice of Intent To Establish Voluntary Criteria for Radon Credentialing Organizations

Notice of Intent To Establish Voluntary Criteria for Radon Credentialing Organizations
A notice of availability was published Wednesday, August, 23, 2017, in the Federal Register seeking public feedback on a proposed approach for developing voluntary criteria for organizations that credential radon service providers. The comment period for this action closes on November 23, 2017. Currently, states receiving indoor radon grants from EPA may only list providers credentialed by one or both of two recognized credentialing bodies or their state-run certification program. These criteria will establish an ongoing and open evaluation process for organizations wanting to credential radon service providers and will help states ensure high-quality radon services are available to their citizens. To access the notice, visit: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=EPA_FRDOC_0001-21169

New Tech Protects Homes from Invisible Radon Threat

You don’t have to smoke to get lung cancer. If you’re unlucky and don’t take precautions, all you have to do is breathe the air in your home.

Radon — a colorless and odorless radioactive gas found in soil — causes more than 21,000 deaths from lung cancer every year in the U.S. — more than carbon monoxide and house fires combined. Released from rock, soil and water, the uranium-derived gas can reach dangerous levels in even the best-built homes.

Read more here.

Announcement and Invitation to the 27th National Radon Training Conference

Announcement and Invitation to the 27th National Radon Training Conference
October 1-4, 2017
New Orleans, LA

The 27th National Radon Training Conference will be held October 2-4 at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside in New Orleans. The conference is hosted by the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and in conjunction with the American Association of Radon Scientists & Technologists (AARST)International Symposium. There are four days of training, presentations and concurrent workshops. Approximately 300 participants are expected to attend. Click here to go to the registration website: http://www.crcpd.org/events/EventDetails.aspx?id=882978.

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Radon Could Be A Hidden Threat In Your Home

Realtor Debra Harris had found just what her client wanted.

A duplex on Morgan Street in Throop was remodeled, in move-in condition and at a price she could afford. It checked all her boxes for an investment property. But when the home inspection came back, there was an issue: radon.

A walk through the home wouldn’t show any sign of the odorless, colorless gas that comes from the decay of uranium.

The gas causes lung cancer and is the primary cause of the cancer among people who don’t smoke, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Luzerne and Lackawanna counties, and most counties in Pennsylvania, are in the EPA’s highest zone for highest potential for unhealthy radon levels.

“She was going to have tenants in there, so she definitely needed that addressed,” Harris said.

The seller wound up installing a radon mitigation system to close the deal. As Harris remembers, it cost about $2,500.

Radon Increases Risk for Malignant Skin Cancer

It is undisputed that radon is a risk factor for developing lung cancer. New research by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) in the context of the Swiss National Cohort study now shows that the naturally occurring radioactive gas radon within one's home also increases the risk to develop malignant skin cancer (malignant melanoma).

The study titled "Effects of Radon and UV Exposure on Skin Cancer Mortality in Switzerland" is published in the scientific peer-reviewed journal Environmental Health Perspectives. It examines the impact of radon and UV exposure on mortality due to malignant skin cancer in Switzerland.

The study analyzed 1,900 deaths due to malignant melanoma which occurred throughout Switzerland between 2000 and 2008 in people aged 20 years and above. The residential radon exposure was modeled on the basis of 45,000 measurements and accounted for the housing's characteristics and the geological conditions of the area.

High Levels of Radon Found in Some Wells Across Pennsylvania

A new U.S. Geological Survey study has discovered high levels of radon in wells across certain areas of Pennsylvania.

The study, which was conducted in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Departments of Health and Environmental Protection, examined 1,041 well samples and found that 14 percent had radon levels at or above the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed alternative maximum contaminant level of 4,000 picocuries per liter. While the EPA does not currently regulate radon in drinking water, it has proposed this alternative limit for public water supplies in states like Pennsylvania, which has an EPA-approved radon indoor air quality program. For states without an approved program, the EPA has proposed a lower, more protective, maximum contaminant level of 300 picocuries per liter.

Bethel Park students collaborate on radon-testing project

Testing for radon comes with the possibility of producing numbers you don’t exactly want to see.

“Luckily, none of our houses in Bethel were above the actionable levels that the EPA sets,” Neil Armstrong Middle School teacher Joe Rosi said, “which is awesome.”

As part of a project involving collaboration with Bethel Park High School students, Rosi’s fifth-graders conducted tests at their homes, determining if any exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s threshold at which corrective action should be taken. For the record, and for aspiring scientists, that’s four picocuries per liter.

“We have kids who already have abatement systems that exist in their houses,” Rosi said. “They didn’t know what they had them for, and now they know.”

Environmental Protection Warns of High Levels of Radon

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection is warning residents about dangerously high levels of radon.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that may cause up to 21,000 lung cancer deaths a year nationally.

A spokesperson for the agency says he could not share which area is affected.

The agency says at least one home has a radon level 25 times higher than recommended. In a letter sent to one resident, the agency says Pennsylvania generally has "some of the highest radon values in the country."

The state is providing grant money to the American Lung Association in Pennsylvania for free radon tests kits to Hampden Township residents.

Read the original article here

The silent killer: How to protect your home against radon gas

Unbeknownst to millions of families, the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers could be lurking inside their homes.

Exposure to radon, a naturally-occurring radioactive gas, claims an estimated 24,000 lives annually, according to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

Many victims have never smoked a cigarette, according to the American Lung Association.

Radon, a Class-A carcinogen, is the second-leading lung cancer threat overall, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The odorless, tasteless and colorless gas can be found anywhere and can go undetected inside homes for years.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports that one in 15 homes will test at or above the EPA’s action level of four picocuries per liter (pCi/L).

A picocurie is a measure of the rate of radon’s radioactive decay.

State Encourages People to Test Homes for Radon

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) - Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers in the United States. Idaho is one of the worst states when it comes to high levels of Radon in homes. Which is why the Idaho Dept. of Health and Welfare wants homeowners to test their home for the radioactive gas.

"Everyone should test their home for radon because you do not know if you have high levels unless you do test," said Jim Faust with the dept. of health and welfare.

Currently, tests are only $9.95, normally the costs is about $40 the tests include shipping and a lab analysis. If you are interested in getting your home tested, sign up for a kit at www.radonidaho.org.

Read more here.