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National Radon Action Month

PLANE CRASHES; 400 IOWANS KILLED. This headline would cause an investigation, yet every year approximately 400 Iowans die from radon-induced lung cancer, and few seem to notice.

Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas. It comes from the natural breakdown (radioactive decay) of uranium in the soil left behind by glaciers. Iowa has the highest incidence of radon in the country.

The Surgeon General warns that radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer. According to the Iowa Department of Public Health, five out of seven homes have an unacceptable level of radon.

The average radon concentration in every Iowa county is above the EPA action level of 4.0pCi/L. Since radon levels aren’t constant, every home (no matter the kind of foundation or age of the home) should be tested at least every two years. Testing is the only way to know a radon level. There is no immediate symptom that will alert you to the presence of radon.

Radon Can Be Deadly, But Very Few Nebraskans Test Their Homes

Health officials say Nebraska has one of the worst radon emission rates in the country and while many homes have dangerous radon levels, residents may be oblivious.

Research scientist Dan Tranter says the colorless, odorless, radioactive gas occurs naturally, rising up from the soil — and it can be deadly.

“If you breathe radon for a long period of time, it damages your lungs, which can lead to lung cancer,” Tranter says. “It is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.” Overall, radon is the third-leading cause of cancer in Nebraska, behind smoking and second-hand smoke.

Continue reading here.

Now Is the Time to Test Your Home for Radon Gas

Nearly 40 percent of Idaho homes tested for radon have higher than recommended levels, according to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.The naturally occurring radioactive gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer, following smoking.

"Radon is a naturally occurring gas and it's created by the uranium that you would find from the soil, so uranium is normally associated with mountains which is why some states like Colorado would be considered to have more radon," explained Colby Adams, who is the environmental health director for the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare's Division of Public Health. "In Idaho, essentially what has happened over time the radon in the mountains has washed away and eroded and it's settled in different areas of the basin."

Radon: A Silent Threat in Iowa—Free Workshop

QUASQUETON – Buchanan County ISU Extension and Outreach has partnered with Buchanan County Environmental Health and Zoning, and Midwest Systems to offer a FREE public RADON workshop.

Did you know 71.6% of Iowa tested homes have radon above the US Environmental Protection Agency’s action level? This is the highest in the US (5 out of 7).

To learn about RADON, how to test your home, and what to do once your results are in; attend the FREE RADON Workshop on Wednesday, Feb. 7, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Quasqueton City Hall (113 Water St N, Quasqueton). Speakers are Matt Even (Buchanan County Environmental Health and Zoning), Roxanne Fuller (Buchanan County ISU Extension and Outreach), and RADON Mitigation Contractor, Matt Griswold.

Learn more and continue reading here.

Department of Environmental Protection Encourages Residents to Test Homes for Radon

With 40 percent of Pennsylvania homes having higher levels of radon than the Environmental Protection Agency considers acceptable, the Department of Environmental Protection encourages Pennsylvanians to perform a simple test for this known human carcinogen.

“Because of the state’s geology, Pennsylvanians are at risk of exposure to high radon levels,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “Fortunately, testing is as simple as one, two, three: Pick up an inexpensive test at a hardware store, open it and set it on a surface in your basement, and in a few days mail the test to the lab. It’s an easy New Year’s resolution to keep and important to your health and the health of your loved ones.”

Radon is an odorless, colorless radioactive gas that occurs naturally from the breakdown of uranium in soil and rocks and enters homes through cracks in the foundation or other openings. High levels of radon tend to be found in basements, but the gas can be found anywhere in the home.

From the Community: Radon Gas Testing Kits Available Through the Health Department

January is National Radon Action Month - test your home!

Waukegan, Ill. - You can't see, smell or taste it, but radon gas could be present at a dangerous level in your home. The Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center is urging residents to test the radon levels in their homes and apartments during the winter months, when indoor radon levels are at their highest.

"Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers, claiming the lives of an estimated 21,000 Americans each year," said Mark Pfister, the Health Department's Executive Director. "Testing for radon is easy, inexpensive, and the only way to know if your family is at risk of radon exposure."

Continue reading this article, and find out how you can get your home tested here.

Radon: The Silent Killer That Can Be Stopped

DENVER (CBS4) – You can’t see it in your home or smell it, but radon could kill you. It is a naturally occurring radioactive gas. According to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, radon is responsible for more than 500 lung cancer deaths in Colorado each year.

Gov. John Hickenlooper has proclaimed January National Radon Action Month in Colorado. The governor is encouraging people to get their homes tested. January makes sense because the test works best when all doors and windows are closed.

If you think you don’t need to test, think again. Every home, in every neighborhood, in every state has the potential to harbor the silent killer.

Continue reading this article here.

Is Radon Lurking in Your Home? Here's Why You Need to Find Out

Asbestos, mold and radon: three hazardous substances you never want to find in your home. While all three can be removed and remediated by trained professionals, radon is different, because you can't see, smell or taste it. That doesn't mean radon is harmless. If left untreated, it can be hazardous to your family's health. In fact, it's the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States.

Where does radon come from?

Learn more and continue reading here.

Q&A: “Should I test for radon if the home already has a radon mitigation system?”

When a home already has an active radon mitigation system, is it even worth testing for radon? That's a great question. To answer that, allow me to share a quick story.

Read more here.

Main office at Portland's Lent School closed due to high radon levels

A second round of radon testing in six rooms at four Portland schools revealed persistent very high levels of radioactive radon in the Lent School main office, so office functions have been moved to another room in the school, district officials announced late Thursday.

It is the latest in a long string of environmental safety problems revealed by officials in Oregon's largest school district this spring and summer.

Radon is an invisible, odorless gas that occurs naturally in the ground. Exposure over long periods of time can lead to lung cancer. Even when vented 24 hours a day, the Lent office gave off radon readings at three time the federal danger threshold....

Full article here: http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2016/06/main_office_at_portlands_lent.html