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Separating fact from fiction concerning radon

Radon gas poses a real, yet easily managed threat to homeowners and homebuyers in Pennsylvania. However, the threats posed by radon gas, as well as the means for dealing with elevated levels of radon gas are often misunderstood by the general public. To help clear up the mysteries surrounding this silent killer, I sat down with local home inspection expert John Kerrigan of Reliable Home Inspection Service.

For more here

Home testing for radon is encouraged

It almost sounds like the trailer for a B horror movie.

Cue scary music.

Deep voice: It could invade your home, and you won’t even know it. You can’t see it, smell it or hear it. And it could kill you.

The people at the American Lung Association and the Duluth Healthy Homes Partnership don’t want to scare anyone. But all of the above is true of radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas that happens to occur quite a bit in Minnesota.

To read more: http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/news/health/3656011-home-testing-radon-encouraged

How to breathe easier at home

How's the atmosphere in your home? We're not talking about the mood or décor – we're talking about the air, literally.

You probably don't think much about the air around you, but you spend hours breathing it every day, and it can be full of stuff you don't want in your lungs.

"Sometimes people overlook indoor air pollutants, which in some ways are very similar to outdoor air pollutants," said Hsin-Neng Hsieh, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark.

"The Environmental Protection Agency has published data saying that pollution in our buildings is two to five times greater than outdoors," said Daniel Kopec, an architect in Glen Ridge who teaches building systems and technology at the institute. "We're spending 90 percent of our time in buildings, so it's a huge problem."

With those warnings in mind, here are seven things you can do to breathe easier inside your four walls:

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Test for Radon

Officials discuss radon levels

Right around springtime four years ago, what Gail Orcutt thought were allergies turned out to be much worse.

“I found out I had lung cancer,” the Pleasant Hill resident said. “I’ve never smoked a day in my life.”

Her cancer didn’t come from cigarettes. Instead, the culprit was a colorless, odorless gas: radon.

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the nation, claiming roughly 21,000 lives each year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Orcutt, a retired teacher and lung-cancer survivor, made it her mission to educate people and raise awareness on the poisonous gas.

Now, after a recurrence of the cancer in August, and only a week out of chemotherapy, she is teaming with an elected official.

Rep. Bruce Braley, D-Iowa, has been spearheading the push to create legislation that would require more testing for radon levels in the state, especially in schools. Braley has advocated in Congress for resources and support.

Study reveals high radon levels in county

A recent study found high levels of a cancer-causing radioactive gas in homes throughout a four-county area that includes Sauk County.

Officials say the results of the study, conducted by the South Central Environmental Health Consortium, should convince more people to have their homes tested for radon.

“We just wanted people to know that there are high levels around here,” said Matt Kachel, an environmental health sanitarian with Sauk County who helped implement the study. “We think it’s a valuable thing to get your home tested.”

Radon is an odorless, invisible, and radioactive gas that naturally occurs in soil. It can seep into homes, and exposure to high levels over long periods of time can cause lung cancer.

From November through January, the consortium, which includes Sauk, Columbia, Juneau and Adams counties, provided free entry in a raffle contest to people who tested their homes for radon. An independent laboratory in Texas then analyzed 273 samples.

Radon levels in Hamilton schools not known, resident says

A Waterdown resident is urging the local school board and provincial government introduce mandatory testing in high risk areas for radon — the second leading cause of lung cancer among Canadians.

A colourless and odourless gas that is naturally produced by the breakdown of uranium in soil, radon can seep through a crack in a building’s foundation.

Robert Graham has been in a two-year long battle with government officials to have testing done at school sites.

“I think the fear is if they test a few of the schools, especially the one-level schools, that if they found that they have high levels that everybody is going to panic,” he said. “It’s not to cause panic it’s just to see are kids still going to schools that may have this radon leakage problem - you don’t know unless you test.”

A grandfather to four children, Graham said the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board has so far been mum on whether it will test some of its facilities.

Downers Grove adopts rules to reduce radon

Downers Grove is updating its building code to include new state rules aimed at reducing radon in new construction.

The Village Council recently approved a mandate that all new residences in town must be built with "passive radon resistant construction," in line with a state law passed in June.

Community Development Director Tom Dabareiner said the law was enacted in response to the growing consensus that radon poses significant health risks. The council approved the measure at its April 1 meeting with all in attendance voting in favor. Commissioners Sean P. Durkin and Geoff Neustadt were absent.

"There's a large portion of the state where there is a significant amount of radon that's found in the soil and then a couple of areas where it's medium," Dabareiner said.

Watchdog Report: Is your school free of radon?

Only a test can find it, yet schools go untested

Radon, an invisible killer, has gone undetected in more than half of New York’s school buildings because testing for the naturally occurring gas is not required.

A analysis by Central New York Media Group of the most recent school building condition reports at the state Education Department found the reports indicate that 1,832 school buildings have not been tested for radon.

More than 400 of those buildings are in 34 counties designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as having high potential for elevated indoor radon levels, according to the newspaper’s analysis of the condition reports for 3,136 public school buildings outside of New York City.

The presence of untested school buildings in potentially high-radon areas runs counter to long-standing advice of public health experts and the EPA.

OPINION: State's radon law rollout puts tenant safety last

With five years to get ready for this deadline, regulators should have been better prepared.

Laws don’t work unless most people comply with them voluntarily. This compliance is helped along by the understanding that violations of the law will be enforced and that the penalties are appropriate.

So, it’s good news that many landlords are trying to follow the law that requires them to test for radon in all buildings with rental units. But it’s not so good to find out that the state has no database of rental properties to know which ones are out of compliance, and that it’s still unclear what agencies will enforce the penalties. It is also not much comfort for tenants to find out that if their apartment is contaminated with radon, they’ll still have to sue the landlord to force remediation.

Iowa House Approves Scaled-Back Bill on Radon in Schools

A scaled-back bill regarding radon testing in Iowa schools passed the whole Iowa House on Tuesday , setting up negotiations between the House and Senate over the issue.

The House has completely rewritten Senate File 366 to direct the state Department of Education to encourage school districts to test for the presence of cancer-causing radon gas in school buildings and to address high concentrations. The bill contains no actual mandate for districts to perform the testing, though, and only requires school officials to notify the department if they have a radon testing and mitigation plan in place or if they plan to adopt such a plan in the future.

Information received by the department will be turned over to the Legislature.

It passed on a 98-1 vote.

Bill sponsor Matt Windschitl, R-Missouri Valley said he’s received a positive response from school superintendents.