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American Association of Radon Scientists & Technologists Announces New ANSI National Standard That Will Reduce Radioactive Gas in New Homes


The American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST) announced that a new standard, ANSI/AARST CCAH-2013, “Reducing Radon in New Construction of 1 & 2 Family Dwellings and Townhouses” was approved on January 11, 2013 by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

The new standard, referred to as RRNC 2.0, was promulgated by the AARST consensus standards writing consortium and provides code specific language for dealing with radon in new construction. The new RRNC 2.0 standard provides a tool to make sure that new homes do not create radon risk for occupants or long term liabilities for developers, bankers and builders.

David Kapturowski, Vice President of AARST, and Chair of the AARST standards committee that created the new document, said that this will be an important contribution to radon risk reduction in the United States.

State Warns of High Radon Levels in Homes

One of every three homes in Utah could have elevated levels of radon, which can cause deadly health problems, but many people have no idea there could be radon poisoning them in their own home.

The Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Radiation Control joined with CanSAR (Cancer Survivors Against Radon) and others on the steps of the Utah State Capitol Wednesday to raise awareness of this issue.

The Governor has declared January as Radon Action Month, and, according to a press release from his office, radon is the second biggest risk factor for lung cancer, next to smoking. It is estimated to cause about 21,000 deaths annually. Radon, a natural decay product of uranium, is a radioactive gas released from rock, soil and water.

DEP Announces Comprehensive Oil and Gas Development Radiation Study

At the direction of Governor Corbett, the Department of Environmental Protection announced today it will undertake a study to look at naturally occurring levels of radioactivity in by-products associated with oil and natural gas development.

In the coming weeks, DEP will seek a peer review of its study plan and begin to sample and analyze the naturally occurring radioactivity levels in flowback waters, treatment solids and drill cuttings, as well as associated matters such as the transportation, storage and disposal of drilling wastes.

DEP routinely reviews radioactivity data in wastes the oil and natural gas industry and other industries generate, and the information the agency has obtained to date indicates very low levels of natural radioactivity. This study, which is expected to take 12 to 14 months, is aimed at ensuring that public health and the environment continue to be protected.

State Lawmakers Push Crackdown on Cancer-Causing Radon

Lawmakers in at least three states are combatting what public health experts call the “silent killer” — radon, an invisible, odorless gas that that seeps into buildings through cracked walls and foundations.

Bills filed in Iowa and Nebraska, and a proposal taking shape in Utah aim to reduce people’s exposure to the gas, the second-leading cause of lung cancer behind tobacco. Radon kills about 21,000 people each year, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The state efforts come as health advocates push to bolster a patchwork of randon laws they say has raised public awareness but still comes up short, and as states fear federal help will face the budget axe.

“We’ve got to get smart about this preventable problem,” says Matt McCoy, an Iowa state senator. “Our hope is that more people will become aware of it and start testing.”

New Radon Numbers Highlight Portland-Area Health Risks

New estimates of radon risks across Oregon underscore the need for homeowners to test for the presence of the odorless, invisible radioactive gas, researchers say.

The update, released this week, suggests that one in every four houses in the Portland area accumulates radon above the level the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says should prompt fixes to keep the gas outdoors.

That's double the national average, said Scott Burns, a Portland State University geology professor who worked with five students to compile radon tests from homes and businesses statewide.

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States after smoking, EPA estimates, and the leading cause among non-smokers.

AARST Announces New ANSI Standard for RRNC -- Codes

The American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST) announced that a new standard, ANSI/AARST CCAH-2013, “Reducing Radon in New Construction of 1 & 2 Family Dwellings and Townhouses” was approved on January 11, 2013 by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).

The new standard, referred to as RRNC 2.0, was promulgated by the AARST consensus standards writing consortium and provides code specific language for dealing with radon in new construction. The new RRNC 2.0 standard provides a tool to make sure that new homes do not create radon risk for occupants or long term liabilities for developers, bankers and builders.

David Kapturowski, Vice President of AARST, and Chair of the AARST standards committee that created the new document, said that this will be an important contribution to radon risk reduction in the United States.

Success with Engaging the Real Estate Industry

As of January 1, 2013, the Ohio EPA instituted changes to its radon program to promote outreach and awareness. In an effort to better educate the local real estate professionals on new rule changes my company has made contact with more than 300 real estate agents and company representatives to brief them on the impacts of these rules on their practices and organizations.

A number of agents who have been through the radon education seminars we provide have until now shown little interest. With the onset of the new rules and our explanations and outreach, interest in radon during the month of January 2013 has peaked tremendously. Our company has two licensed radon professionals on staff and in recent weeks have held multiple meetings with various local companies anxious to learn.

There is an awareness and a need for more education in the real estate industry that is typically responsible for 80 percent of the radon tests performed in the U.S.

Call for Papers - 2013 International Radon Symposium

Call for Papers - 2013 International Radon Symposium

The AARST 2013International Radon Symposium welcomes the participation of members of the scientific and medical community, radon testers, diagnosticians, mitigators, educators, public policy leaders and business leaders as well as consumers, both nationally and internationally.

Abstracts: Your abstract should convey in 150 words or less the essence of the intended presentation, clearly indicating the contribution it will make. Abstracts will be screened by the AARST Editorial Board. Authors who are not experienced in writing abstracts should look at examples of abstracts from previous symposia. These can be found on the AARST.org website.
Original research, including policy and business-related papers, are especially encouraged in the following areas with an emphasis on practical application:
• New Models for radon risk reduction policy and programs
o Private Risk Management Initiatives
o Innovations from Local, State, Provincial and Native Peoples

Radon Fairy Spreads Important Message

Radon Fairy Spreads Important Message

The Nevada Radon Education Program, under the direction of Susan H. Howe, produces a wide array of outreach items on a yearly basis to spread the radon message. Examples of some of these efforts include door tags, engaging radon Public Service Announcements (PSAs), news articles, educational programs, street banners and massive amounts of educational displays and posters.

This year in particular, a different sort of outreach effort took place at the Nevada Day event. Radon activist Denise Uber (pictured) dressed up as the “Radon Fairy” to educate people about the harmful effects of radon. Uber is a strong advocate for radon awareness. She previously had her home mitigated, appeared in local newspapers and is a continued supporter of the Nevada Radon Education Program.

Have any school districts within your state implemented EPA's Indoor Air Quality Tools for Schools?