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National Radon Action Month

Time to Test for Radon

If you haven’t tested your home for radon recently, now’s a good time.

Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that forms naturally when radioactive metals break down in rocks, soil and groundwater. January is National Radon Awareness Month. Winter is a good time to test your home, Teton County Public Health Department response coordinator Rachael Wheeler said.

“The reason winter is a better time to test is because your house is closed up already,” she said. “If you test in the summer, we tell people you need to do things like have all your windows shut, not use your fan and shut your doors as quickly as possible. It’s an easier time to test than the summer months.”

Short-term radon detection kits are available for $10 at Teton County Environmental Health in the public health building at 460 E. Pearl Ave. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Mercy Medical Center to Host Radon Awareness Event

Chances are you don't know whether there's radon lurking in your home. After all, radon is an odorless, colorless, tasteless, radioactive gas.

There's somewhere you can go for more information. Mercy Medical Center in Sioux City will hold a radon awareness event on Tuesday, January 23rd, from 6:30-7:30 pm in the Leiter Room, near the south lobby.

Find out more here.

From the Community: Radon Gas Testing Kits Available Through the Health Department

January is National Radon Action Month - test your home!

Waukegan, Ill. - You can't see, smell or taste it, but radon gas could be present at a dangerous level in your home. The Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center is urging residents to test the radon levels in their homes and apartments during the winter months, when indoor radon levels are at their highest.

"Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers, claiming the lives of an estimated 21,000 Americans each year," said Mark Pfister, the Health Department's Executive Director. "Testing for radon is easy, inexpensive, and the only way to know if your family is at risk of radon exposure."

Continue reading this article, and find out how you can get your home tested here.

Radon: The Silent Killer That Can Be Stopped

DENVER (CBS4) – You can’t see it in your home or smell it, but radon could kill you. It is a naturally occurring radioactive gas. According to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, radon is responsible for more than 500 lung cancer deaths in Colorado each year.

Gov. John Hickenlooper has proclaimed January National Radon Action Month in Colorado. The governor is encouraging people to get their homes tested. January makes sense because the test works best when all doors and windows are closed.

If you think you don’t need to test, think again. Every home, in every neighborhood, in every state has the potential to harbor the silent killer.

Continue reading this article here.

Be aware of Radon dangers

January was National Radon Action Month and 50 percent of homes in Colorado are estimated to be above the recommended action level of 4pCi/L, Radon kills 21,000 Americans each year and is the number one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. It is important to know the facts about this silent killer and to test your home for its presence.

Read More Here.

Radon: Unmasking the Invisible Killer

Radon gas is invisible and odorless. But it reveals itself in a deadly footprint it can leave behind -- lung cancer. In fact, exposure to radon gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer, and one in 15 homes in America is at risk from elevated levels of radon. January is National Radon Action Month and the perfect time to take action to protect you and your loved ones from this invisible killer.

Understanding Radon
Radon is a naturally occurring invisible, odorless and tasteless gas. It occurs when uranium in the soil and rock underground breaks down to form radon. As radon decays, it releases radioactive byproducts that are inhaled and can cause lung cancer. Radon enters a home through cracks in the walls, basement floors, foundations and other openings, and can build up to dangerous concentrations.

National Radon Action Month: Spreading awareness

You can't see it, smell it, or taste it in your home but there may be dangerous levels or radon lurking in your house.

About twenty-one thousand Americans die each year from lung cancer caused from radon. The month of January is National Radon Action month and the EPA and U.S. Surgeon General are encouraging everyone to test their homes, businesses, and schools.

"I see a lot of people with cancer. Probably once every two weeks I'm in somebody's home that has had cancer and don't have an explanation for it, in particular lung cancer and have come to find out that their radons high," said Kevin Siers, owner of KSA Radon Services.

Other prevention techniques the EPA is promoting this month are spreading the word and attending a radon awareness event in our area.

Learn more about how you can raise awareness!

Home testing for radon is encouraged

It almost sounds like the trailer for a B horror movie.

Cue scary music.

Deep voice: It could invade your home, and you won’t even know it. You can’t see it, smell it or hear it. And it could kill you.

The people at the American Lung Association and the Duluth Healthy Homes Partnership don’t want to scare anyone. But all of the above is true of radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas that happens to occur quite a bit in Minnesota.

To read more: http://www.duluthnewstribune.com/news/health/3656011-home-testing-radon-encouraged

Radon Action Month in Illinois: What Are the Levels in Your Home?

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - Radon is the most significant health risk homeowners face, and this month state leaders are encouraging residents to test their homes for the dangerous gas.

According to the Illinois Emergency Management Agency, nearly 1,200 citizens die annually from radon-related lung cancer. Patrick Daniels, radon program manager at the Illinois Emergency Management Agency, says now is the best time of the year to check the radon levels inside a home.

"We want to test homes under what we call 'closed house conditions,'" says Daniels. "Being as cold as it is we tend to keep our windows and doors shut and homes closed up and pretty tight so it just makes it a good time to test."

Test kits range in price from $10 to $30, and can be purchased at a local hardware store or online. Daniels says it's recommended that homeowners who are involved in a real estate transaction hire a licensed professional to test the home for radon.

What is the main activity that you plan to partake in to promote National Radon Action Month?