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radon in schools

Reading, Writing and Radon

Reading, Writing and Radon

You can't see it, you can't touch it, you can't taste it, and you can't smell it.

Radon develops from the breakdown of soil and rock, seeping into buildings and the air we breathe. University of Iowa Professor Bill Field is on of the world's foremost experts on radon. He says chronic exposure to the gas could be deadly;

"If you're very unlucky you can be exposed to radon for just a couple of weeks and from that exposure, develop lung cancer."

Radon levels vary from state to state across the country, but Iowa and most of Illinois are considered "ground zero" for the radioactive, cancer-causing gas. And the places we expect to be safe, could be far from it.

Dr. Field estimates 90,000 classrooms nationwide are riddles with radon; our youth being exposed to it everyday.

Radon Findings Debunk Cancer Cluster Concerns at Clinton Twp. Schools

CLINTON TWP. – The results are in, and two of Clinton Township’s four school buildings--Spruce Run School and Clinton Township Middle School--have tested higher than the acceptable limit for radon concentrations established by state and federal agencies.

The testing was originally spurred by an unusual number of teachers in the district diagnosed with cancer, but school officials said testing confirmed that the presence of radon gas was unrelated to the cancer cases.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is odorless, colorless and tasteless, said officials, and can be harmful when found in high concentrations

Public Meeting

Expecting a large turnout of parents to hear a presentation by the school district’s consultants, Manasquan-based Brinkerhoff Environmental Services, a special public meeting was held at 7 p.m. last Wednesday, March 21 in the auditorium of the middle school, but it was the proverbial party to which virtually nobody came.

The Radon Threat Is Still With Us (New York Times)

Iowa City

“I AM really sorry to tell you this, but you have less than a 50 percent chance of living for one year and about a 15 percent chance of living for five years.”

This gloomy prognosis is delivered each year to thousands of Americans who have been given a diagnosis of lung cancer caused by exposure to the radioactive gas radon. Since the late 1980s, a half million Americans have died from radon-induced lung cancer, including a significant number who never smoked a day in their lives. You may have heard of radon more than 20 years ago when dangerous levels were first found in homes across the country. But the risks posed by this gas still have not been addressed in much of the nation.

Radon Findings Debunk Cancer Cluster Concerns at Clinton Twp. Schools

Radon Findings Debunk Cancer Cluster Concerns at Clinton Twp. Schools

CLINTON TWP. – The results are in, and two of Clinton Township’s four school buildings have tested higher than the acceptable limit for radon concentrations established by state and federal agencies.

The testing was originally spurred by an unusual number of teachers in the district diagnosed with cancer, but school officials said the findings confirmed that the presence of radon gas was unrelated to the cancer cases.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is odorless, colorless and tasteless, said officials, and can be harmful when found in high concentrations

Jason Hooper, Brinkerhoff Environmental Services' senior project manager, presented the radon test findings and explained the mitigation plan to a small group of parents and administrators at a public meeting Wednesday, March 21 at Clinton Township Middle School.

Radon Gas in U.S. Classrooms

Radon Gas in U.S. Classrooms

Health officials warn that thousands of the nation's classrooms are filled with high levels of radioactive radon gas. Chronic exposure could lead to lung cancer, but many school districts aren't doing anything about it.

Watch a video of Dr. David Sanderson, Professor of Medicine Emeritus and learn more about radon.

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 29, 2012 — Imagine your child is smoking a half a pack of cigarettes per day at school. Inhaling radon, even at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s action level, the level at which it recommends schools take action to mitigate radon exposure, yields just about the same result as that half-pack-a-day habit. That’s what radon expert Bill Field told the Today show in a new investigative report.

Statements from EPA, Congress about Radon Report

In addition to obtaining a statement from the EPA, Rossen Reports reached out to the chairs and ranking members of environmental committees, asking why Congress has not done more about radon testing in public schools. Rep. Fred Upton, Rep. Henry Waxman and Sen. James Inhofe responded with statements.

EPA statement:
“EPA strives to reduce children's risks from radon exposure at home and in school. While the most significant possible risks are at home, where kids and families spend most of their time, radon can be a concern at school as well. EPA strongly recommends that both homes and schools are tested for radon, and that action is taken when high levels are found.

The good news is that if high levels of radon are detected, the solutions are practical, effective, and affordable.

Statements from EPA, Congress about Radon Report

In addition to obtaining a statement from the EPA, Rossen Reports reached out to the chairs and ranking members of environmental committees, asking why Congress has not done more about radon testing in public schools. Rep. Fred Upton, Rep. Henry Waxman and Sen. James Inhofe responded with statements.

EPA statement:
“EPA strives to reduce children's risks from radon exposure at home and in school. While the most significant possible risks are at home, where kids and families spend most of their time, radon can be a concern at school as well. EPA strongly recommends that both homes and schools are tested for radon, and that action is taken when high levels are found.

The good news is that if high levels of radon are detected, the solutions are practical, effective, and affordable.