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radon in Ohio

Many Ohio Schools Don’t Check for Radon in a State Known for High Radon Levels

Recently, WKYC broadcast a report about radon levels in Ohio Schools. Even though most of Ohio is classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a Zone 1 area, few schools perform radon testing.

A Zone 1 area is described as having the highest potential for a predicted average indoor radon screening level greater than 4 pCi/L. A small percentage of counties in Ohio that are not listed as a Zone 1 area have been listed under the EPA’s Zone 2 category. Zone 2 predicts an average indoor radon screening level of between 2 and 4 pCi/L.

Even though children spend approximately 8 hours a day in the classroom, Ohio does not require radon testing in its schools. According to the WKYC report, “The EPA estimates about 70,000 classrooms in the U.S. have radon levels at or above the action level of 4 pCi/L. But federal laws do not mandate radon testing in schools.”

Radon Remedy | Surge in Testing Fuels Modifications to Area Homes

Radon Remedy | Surge in Testing Fuels Modifications to Area Homes

Radon — the odorless, colorless gas found in Ohio soil — isn’t so invisible anymore.

The number of Ohio homes tested for the gas has skyrocketed the past few years after dropping during the recession.

Last year, 23,494 Ohio properties were tested for radon, compared with 1,464 in 2007, according to the Ohio Department of Health.

About half the tests detect radon levels above the Environmental Protection Agency’s safe limit of 4.0 picocuries per liter.

The result: Radon mitigation “stacks” — plastic pipes typically attached to the side of a house to draw the gas away — are appearing throughout the state. During the past two years, almost 11,000 mitigation systems have been installed in Ohio.

Because most radon tests are done for potential buyers when a house is being sold, sellers typically bear the $1,000 cost to install the systems before the deal can go through.

Radon Levels Go Unchecked in Many Ohio Schools