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radon testing in schools

Is radon in Utah schools? KSL investigates

HOLLADAY — A silent killer may be lurking in Utah schools, but districts aren't required to test for it. Radon is a colorless, odorless gas that seeps up from the ground. Health officials say it is the second-leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Many Utahns have tested their homes and found high levels of radon, but what's going on in our schools?

To find out, the KSL Investigators teamed up with radon technicians and district officials to test six elementary schools in the City of Holladay: Cottonwood Elementary, Crestview Elementary, Howard R. Driggs Elementary, Morningside Elementary, Oakwood Elementary, and Spring Lane Elementary.

Armed with more than 200 charcoal test kits, Radovent technicians set out samples in every office, classroom, and space frequently occupied by teachers, students and staff.

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Local nonprofit's radon program helps protect children in daycare

Recently, a Lindenhurst daycare provider took advantage of a free program from Respiratory Health Association to help ensure her charges' safety. Robin Kolec, owner of Robin's Family Home Daycare, attended a seminar on radon through the Lake County Home Daycare Network.

At the seminar, a Respiratory Health Association educator taught daycare providers from licensed daycare centers and licensed daycare homes about new radon regulations. The law requires daycare centers and daycare homes be tested for radon at least once every three years. Respiratory Health Association provided radon test kits - which are easy to use at home - and raffled off a home radon mitigation. Robin, who had higher than recommended radon levels in her home, won the mitigation and put her mind to ease about her family's and her daycare children's safety.

Iowa Senate Says Schools Should Test for Radon

Schools would be required to test for radon, a colorless, odorless gas that can leak through cracks in building foundations, under legislation that passed the Iowa Senate on Wednesday.

The measure won bipartisan support, passing through Senate 37-13. It now moves to the House.

The bill would require public and private schools to test for the gas and install a system to expel it from buildings. It also would require residential construction companies to install pipes to extract the gas from homes built after Jan. 1, 2015.

Bill sponsor Sen. Matt McCoy, D-Des Moines, said it would be negligent for lawmakers to do nothing to protect Iowa residents from radon.

SILENT KILLER: Radon In Iowa Schools and Homes

You send your children to school, assuming they will be reasonably safe. So, why is a middle school principal on a mission to warn all parents about a potential health hazard to Iowa students?

Steph Langstraat, Principal at Monroe Middle School in Prairie City is fighting back against radon, a potentially deadly chemical seeping up through the foundation of her school into classrooms and halls.

Monroe Middle School is not alone; Iowa has the highest uranium concentration in the nation. As uranium breaks-down, it releases radon gas that has potential to cause lung cancer. The gas rises up through an estimated 3/4 of the homes and building foundations in Iowa.

Radon Levels Go Unchecked in Many Ohio Schools