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National Cancer Institute

Radon Health Hazards Stressed During January

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says radon gas is the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers.

Coming up in January, the National Cancer Institute, the American Lung Association and the Centers for Disease Control encourage you to test your home for radon.

Radon is a naturally occurring, invisible, odorless and radioactive gas that forms from the breakdown of Uranium.

One in 15 homes contains high levels of rddon, according to the EPA, and Harvard University ranks Radon as America's #1 home hazard.

The first step toward lowering your risk is by getting a measurement of the radon levels inside your home.

A measurement can cost between $100 and $250, according to Jerry Peterson, home inspector and owner of Peterson Radon Services in Butte.

Take Action on Radon Gas to Prevent Lung Cancer

Federal Radon Action Week is Oct. 15-21, and health agencies throughout the United States have joined forces to promote awareness of the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers, according to the Surgeon General.

The American Lung Association, Centers for Disease Control and National Cancer Institute agree that radon is a national health problem and encourage radon testing during the October awareness drive.

Radon is a naturally-occurring, invisible and odorless radioactive gas. One in 15 American homes contains high levels of radon. Millions of Americans are knowingly exposed to this dangerous gas.

In fact, a recent study by Harvard University ranks radon as America’s No. 1 in-home hazard. By taking simple steps to test your home for radon and fix any problems as necessary, the health hazard can be avoided.

Federal Government Takes Action on Radon Gas to Prevent Lung Cancer Deaths in 2012

Oct. 15-21 is Federal Radon Action Week, according to the Surgeon General. Health agencies throughout the United States have joined forces to promote awareness of the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers. The American Lung Association, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Cancer Institute all agree that radon is a national health problem and encourage radon testing during the October awareness drive.

Radon is a naturally-occurring, invisible and odorless radioactive gas. One in 15 American homes contains high levels of radon. Millions of Americans are unknowingly exposed to this dangerous gas. In fact, a recent study by Harvard University ranks radon as America’s No. 1 in-home hazard. By taking simple steps to test your home for radon and fix if necessary, this health hazard can be avoided.