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Be aware of Radon dangers

January was National Radon Action Month and 50 percent of homes in Colorado are estimated to be above the recommended action level of 4pCi/L, Radon kills 21,000 Americans each year and is the number one cause of lung cancer among non-smokers. It is important to know the facts about this silent killer and to test your home for its presence.

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Radon risks for Lyon County

KDHE is encouraging all Kansans to test their home for radon gas. Studies have shown that about one out of every three radon measurements performed in Kansas are elevated. Elevated levels of radon have been detected in every county in the state with some areas testing higher than others.

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January is National Radon Action Month

January is National Radon Action Month, and winter is an excellent time for Kansas residents to test their home for this odorless, colorless and tasteless gas that causes nearly 100 times more deaths each year than carbon monoxide poisoning.

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Kings County households offered free radon test kits to assess lung cancer risk

The California Department of Public Health will offer Kings County residents free radon testing kits in an effort to prevent lung cancer.

Radon is a colorless, odorless gas that develops naturally. After cigarette smoking, radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S., according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Participants will place the test in their home for a few days, then send it back for analysis. The test does not interfere with normal household activities.

Read more here: http://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/article116525663.html#storylink=cpy

Doctors urge testing for radon in homes

Radon, first discovered in Berks in the 1980s, is a colorless, odorless, tasteless natural gas, stemming from uranium and found in the soil.

"I think it's something people typically underestimate and don't really understand," said Dr. Dennis Sopka, Lehigh Valley Health Network.

Radon causes 15,000 cases of lung cancer each year, according to scientists. Sopka said the real concern is long-term exposure.

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Do I Have a Radon Problem at my House?

As Homes Cozy Up For Winter, Radon Levels Can Build

With winter on the way, many people are making sure best practices are in place for a weather-tight season. The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) November 1st Soils Matter blog post explains why “home sweet home” is worth an inexpensive radon test for peace of mind through the winter months.

Nick Comerford, a professor in the soil and water science department at University of Florida, explains how radon forms. Its parent material, uranium, is found in most soil. As uranium decays, it eventually becomes radon gas. Depending on the level, radon gas can lead to health issues, including lung cancer. The risk increases if cigarette smoke and other particles are also present.

“Radon can move as a gas through the soil and enter your house through holes in the foundation.” Comerford says. “These holes might be found in places like the shower, toilet, other drains, etc. Any dust particles you have floating around your house collect radon – which you can then inhale.”

Indoor radon: What you need to know about this deadly poison

You can’t see it, smell it or taste it, but radon gas could be in your home causing serious health problems for you and your family.

Believe it or not, the EPA has ranked indoor radon as among the most serious environmental health issues today. With stakes that high, it’s time to learn more. Erlend Bolle, CTO of Airthings, manufacturer of quality radon detectors, shares the following facts.

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Having children at home did not prompt parents to test for radon, secondhand smoke

A University of Louisville School of Nursing researcher has found that the presence of children in the home did not motivate parents to test and mitigate for radon and secondhand tobacco smoke, both of which cause lung cancer. The findings highlight a need to raise awareness on these exposure risks and their long-term impact on children.

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Five Years Later, Radon Levels are Lingering Reminder of 2011 Louisa Earthquake

It’s been nearly five years since an earthquake hit Virginia, toppling chimneys and brick walls, cracking foundations and toppling furniture. No one was killed or seriously injured, and for many people, it’s just an exciting memory, but for some the quake may have produced a silent but dangerous problem for homeowners.

Wolfgang Hermann runs a company called Central Virginia Radon -- testing for and getting rid of a radioactive gas that comes from rocks and soil - leaking into houses and putting their residents at increased risk for lung cancer. Shortly after the Mineral earthquake, he made a surprising discovery.

“I went to a customer who had a radon monitor at home, a plug in device where they could detect, yes, after the earthquake it went up twice as much.”

And he heard of other cases where the same thing happened.

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