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Pennsylvania

Radon Could Be A Hidden Threat In Your Home

Realtor Debra Harris had found just what her client wanted.

A duplex on Morgan Street in Throop was remodeled, in move-in condition and at a price she could afford. It checked all her boxes for an investment property. But when the home inspection came back, there was an issue: radon.

A walk through the home wouldn’t show any sign of the odorless, colorless gas that comes from the decay of uranium.

The gas causes lung cancer and is the primary cause of the cancer among people who don’t smoke, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Luzerne and Lackawanna counties, and most counties in Pennsylvania, are in the EPA’s highest zone for highest potential for unhealthy radon levels.

“She was going to have tenants in there, so she definitely needed that addressed,” Harris said.

The seller wound up installing a radon mitigation system to close the deal. As Harris remembers, it cost about $2,500.

High Levels of Radon Found in Some Wells Across Pennsylvania

A new U.S. Geological Survey study has discovered high levels of radon in wells across certain areas of Pennsylvania.

The study, which was conducted in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Departments of Health and Environmental Protection, examined 1,041 well samples and found that 14 percent had radon levels at or above the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed alternative maximum contaminant level of 4,000 picocuries per liter. While the EPA does not currently regulate radon in drinking water, it has proposed this alternative limit for public water supplies in states like Pennsylvania, which has an EPA-approved radon indoor air quality program. For states without an approved program, the EPA has proposed a lower, more protective, maximum contaminant level of 300 picocuries per liter.

Environmental Protection Warns of High Levels of Radon

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection is warning residents about dangerously high levels of radon.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that may cause up to 21,000 lung cancer deaths a year nationally.

A spokesperson for the agency says he could not share which area is affected.

The agency says at least one home has a radon level 25 times higher than recommended. In a letter sent to one resident, the agency says Pennsylvania generally has "some of the highest radon values in the country."

The state is providing grant money to the American Lung Association in Pennsylvania for free radon tests kits to Hampden Township residents.

Read the original article here

The silent killer: How to protect your home against radon gas

Unbeknownst to millions of families, the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers could be lurking inside their homes.

Exposure to radon, a naturally-occurring radioactive gas, claims an estimated 24,000 lives annually, according to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

Many victims have never smoked a cigarette, according to the American Lung Association.

Radon, a Class-A carcinogen, is the second-leading lung cancer threat overall, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The odorless, tasteless and colorless gas can be found anywhere and can go undetected inside homes for years.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports that one in 15 homes will test at or above the EPA’s action level of four picocuries per liter (pCi/L).

A picocurie is a measure of the rate of radon’s radioactive decay.

USGS Finds Elevated Levels of Arsenic, Radon, Methane in Some Private Wells in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania

Tests of 75 private drinking water wells in Lycoming County, in north-central Pennsylvania, found water from most of the sampled wells contained concentrations of radon that exceeded a proposed, nonbinding health standard for drinking water. Smaller percentages of the wells contained concentrations of arsenic or methane that exceed existing drinking water standards.

Read More Here.

WBRE in Wilkes-Barre Hosts Two Hour Radon Program

WBRE in Wilkes-Barre Hosts Two Hour Radon Program

On January 26th, the media station WBRE in Wilkes-Barre PA agreed to host radon professionals from the Department of Environmental Protection for a call-in program. Participants were on air for two hours doing occasional on-camera interviews and answering viewers' calls. The program reached approximately 19 counties and 1.5 million viewers! (*From left to right in the photograph are Paul Houle, Kevin Stewart, Matt Shields, and Andrew Taverna)

Educational Green Home Display at PA Farm Show

Educational Green Home Display at PA Farm Show

We participated in the Pennsylvania Farm Show with the Department of Environmental Protection's Educational Green Home Display--a display that has since been entered in national competition (the Modular Exhibit Design or "MOD" Awards) for Best Graphics!

DEP Announces Comprehensive Oil and Gas Development Radiation Study

At the direction of Governor Corbett, the Department of Environmental Protection announced today it will undertake a study to look at naturally occurring levels of radioactivity in by-products associated with oil and natural gas development.

In the coming weeks, DEP will seek a peer review of its study plan and begin to sample and analyze the naturally occurring radioactivity levels in flowback waters, treatment solids and drill cuttings, as well as associated matters such as the transportation, storage and disposal of drilling wastes.

DEP routinely reviews radioactivity data in wastes the oil and natural gas industry and other industries generate, and the information the agency has obtained to date indicates very low levels of natural radioactivity. This study, which is expected to take 12 to 14 months, is aimed at ensuring that public health and the environment continue to be protected.

American Lung Association in Pa. Offers Free Radon Test Kits Online

ALA-PA Partners with Department of Environmental Protection to provide the program.

The American Lung Association in Pennsylvania announced this week that it is providing free radon test kits to the public on its website.

The ALA-PA said one test kit per Pennsylvania household may be requested, and that those asking for kits should be residents who don't have a previous test result for their homes. The offer is valid while supplies last, according to a release.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas. It is colorless, odorless and tasteless, and it is the second-leading cause of lung cancer, after cigarette smoking.

State Decertifies, Fines Radon Specialist

DEP says radon systems weren't installed properly.

The state has taken the unusual step of decertifying a radon specialist who, officials say, improperly installed systems and violated other regulations in Lehigh, Bucks and Montgomery counties.

Homeowners who hired Environmental Concepts Technology should have their radon removal systems inspected, state officials said, because the systems may not be working properly and may be exposing them to dangerous radon gas.

The Department of Environmental Protection announced late last month it had fined the company's owner, Christopher Ford of Abington Township, Montgomery County, $58,875 and decertified him from testing for radon because of problems with his work, including six systems installed in Orefield.