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New Guide for Health Care Providers!

The Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc., has developed Reducing the Risk From Radon: Information and Interventionsa new guide for health care providers titled Reducing the Risk From Radon: Information and Interventions. This guide was designed to furnish health care providers with the information they need to reduce their patients' exposures to radon. Radon is estimated to cause about 21,100 lung cancer deaths per year and is the leading environmental cause of cancer mortality in the United States.
This guide has the latest information on:

Department of Environmental Protection Encourages Residents to Test Homes for Radon

With 40 percent of Pennsylvania homes having higher levels of radon than the Environmental Protection Agency considers acceptable, the Department of Environmental Protection encourages Pennsylvanians to perform a simple test for this known human carcinogen.

“Because of the state’s geology, Pennsylvanians are at risk of exposure to high radon levels,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “Fortunately, testing is as simple as one, two, three: Pick up an inexpensive test at a hardware store, open it and set it on a surface in your basement, and in a few days mail the test to the lab. It’s an easy New Year’s resolution to keep and important to your health and the health of your loved ones.”

Radon is an odorless, colorless radioactive gas that occurs naturally from the breakdown of uranium in soil and rocks and enters homes through cracks in the foundation or other openings. High levels of radon tend to be found in basements, but the gas can be found anywhere in the home.

Presentations Available from the 2017 National Radon Training Conference and the International Radon Symposium

National Radon Training Conference and International Radon Symposium:

The joint meeting of the 27th National Radon Training Conference and the International Radon Symposium was held October 2-4, 2017 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The conference was hosted by the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and the American Association of Radon Scientists & Technologists (AARST). Over 400 participants from the public and private sector, non-profits and universities attended four days of training, presentations and concurrent workshops.

Presentations made on day one at the joint opening sessions and the CRCPD meeting for days two and three are available in the resources section or by clicking here: Presentations—27th National Radon Training Conference.

EPA Grant Helps Protect Vermont Residents From Radon Exposure

BOSTON - The state of Vermont has received $105,000 that will support efforts to reduce exposure and health risks of radon found in buildings and schools.

The Vermont Department of Health received funds to provide long term test kits for homeowners, and to promote radon-resistant construction techniques in new buildings and renovations. The project will also offer technical assistance for assessing and reducing radon in schools.

The State of Vermont matches the federal award with 40 percent state funding to support actions in the state's approved work plan.

Continue reading here.

National Radon Action Plan Added to RadonLeaders.org

Radonleaders.org now has a section dedicated to the national radon action plan (NRAP). The NRAP is a strategy for saving lives coordinating the actions of three federal departments and nine national organizations.

It highlights progress in addition to describing strategies to reduce radon risk. Click NRAP for more information.

Radon Poster Contest Gets Underway

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah students are urged to help increase awareness of radon by participating in the 2017 National Radon Poster Contest.

Radon is a naturally occurring, invisible and odorless gas that can enter homes through cracks in the basement floor or from well water. According to the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, 1 in 3 Utah homes have elevated levels of radon, which has been linked to lung cancer.

The contest is being held in partnership with the DEQ, the Utah Department of Health, the Utah Cancer Action Network and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Children ages 9-18 are eligible to participate. Participants will compete in three categories: grades four through six; grades seven through nine; and grades 10 thought 12.

Read more here.

Notice of Intent To Establish Voluntary Criteria for Radon Credentialing Organizations

Notice of Intent To Establish Voluntary Criteria for Radon Credentialing Organizations
A notice of availability was published Wednesday, August, 23, 2017, in the Federal Register seeking public feedback on a proposed approach for developing voluntary criteria for organizations that credential radon service providers. The comment period for this action closes on November 23, 2017. Currently, states receiving indoor radon grants from EPA may only list providers credentialed by one or both of two recognized credentialing bodies or their state-run certification program. These criteria will establish an ongoing and open evaluation process for organizations wanting to credential radon service providers and will help states ensure high-quality radon services are available to their citizens. To access the notice, visit: https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=EPA_FRDOC_0001-21169

New Tech Protects Homes from Invisible Radon Threat

You don’t have to smoke to get lung cancer. If you’re unlucky and don’t take precautions, all you have to do is breathe the air in your home.

Radon — a colorless and odorless radioactive gas found in soil — causes more than 21,000 deaths from lung cancer every year in the U.S. — more than carbon monoxide and house fires combined. Released from rock, soil and water, the uranium-derived gas can reach dangerous levels in even the best-built homes.

Read more here.

Radon Could Be A Hidden Threat In Your Home

Realtor Debra Harris had found just what her client wanted.

A duplex on Morgan Street in Throop was remodeled, in move-in condition and at a price she could afford. It checked all her boxes for an investment property. But when the home inspection came back, there was an issue: radon.

A walk through the home wouldn’t show any sign of the odorless, colorless gas that comes from the decay of uranium.

The gas causes lung cancer and is the primary cause of the cancer among people who don’t smoke, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Luzerne and Lackawanna counties, and most counties in Pennsylvania, are in the EPA’s highest zone for highest potential for unhealthy radon levels.

“She was going to have tenants in there, so she definitely needed that addressed,” Harris said.

The seller wound up installing a radon mitigation system to close the deal. As Harris remembers, it cost about $2,500.

High Levels of Radon Found in Some Wells Across Pennsylvania

A new U.S. Geological Survey study has discovered high levels of radon in wells across certain areas of Pennsylvania.

The study, which was conducted in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Departments of Health and Environmental Protection, examined 1,041 well samples and found that 14 percent had radon levels at or above the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed alternative maximum contaminant level of 4,000 picocuries per liter. While the EPA does not currently regulate radon in drinking water, it has proposed this alternative limit for public water supplies in states like Pennsylvania, which has an EPA-approved radon indoor air quality program. For states without an approved program, the EPA has proposed a lower, more protective, maximum contaminant level of 300 picocuries per liter.