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Federal Radon Action Plan

It's Time to Get Serious About Harmful Radon Exposure

Radon, a naturally-occurring invisible gas, is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Twenty-one thousand Americans die from radon-induced lung cancer each year. You can't see, smell or taste radon, but it may be a problem in your home. The good news is that radon exposure is preventable. The American Lung Association and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are committed to fighting radon. Now, we're enlisting others to help take the fight to a whole new level -- because no one should have to suffer from preventable radon-caused cancer.

New radon federal testing and mitigation requirements

You won't believe this, but radon is back in the environmental forefront in a big way! As of June, radon testing and mitigation is now required under federal law. HUD's Office of Multifamily Housing's new policy requires radon testing and, if applicable, mitigation for most new FHA-insured construction, conversion and substantial rehabilitation projects, as well as most FHA-insured refinance transactions.

As stated on HUD's website: "Radon is a priority of the Federal Radon Action Plan, developed by a federal government interagency team chaired by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This invisible air hazard in homes is preventable and there are straight-forward, low-cost solutions to protect families against radon risks," said Janet McCabe, EPA principal deputy assistant administrator for the Office of Air and Radiation. "These new HUD policies will better protect thousands of Americans in the years ahead."

Take Action on Radon Gas to Prevent Lung Cancer

Federal Radon Action Week is Oct. 15-21, and health agencies throughout the United States have joined forces to promote awareness of the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers, according to the Surgeon General.

The American Lung Association, Centers for Disease Control and National Cancer Institute agree that radon is a national health problem and encourage radon testing during the October awareness drive.

Radon is a naturally-occurring, invisible and odorless radioactive gas. One in 15 American homes contains high levels of radon. Millions of Americans are knowingly exposed to this dangerous gas.

In fact, a recent study by Harvard University ranks radon as America’s No. 1 in-home hazard. By taking simple steps to test your home for radon and fix any problems as necessary, the health hazard can be avoided.

Federal Government Takes Action on Radon Gas to Prevent Lung Cancer Deaths in 2012

Oct. 15-21 is Federal Radon Action Week, according to the Surgeon General. Health agencies throughout the United States have joined forces to promote awareness of the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers. The American Lung Association, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Cancer Institute all agree that radon is a national health problem and encourage radon testing during the October awareness drive.

Radon is a naturally-occurring, invisible and odorless radioactive gas. One in 15 American homes contains high levels of radon. Millions of Americans are unknowingly exposed to this dangerous gas. In fact, a recent study by Harvard University ranks radon as America’s No. 1 in-home hazard. By taking simple steps to test your home for radon and fix if necessary, this health hazard can be avoided.

New EPA Campaign to Protect Workers from Top Cancer Cause

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other federal agencies have joined forces to reduce exposure to radon, one of the leading causes of lung cancer. According to the environmental agency, radon exposure causes some 21,000 lung cancer deaths each year and is the second leading cause of the disease in the United States.

Through the Federal Radon Action Plan, agencies will demonstrate the importance of radon risk reduction, address finance and incentive issues regarding testing and mitigation, and build demand for services from industry professionals. According to EPA, “the plan will help spur greater action in the marketplace, create jobs in the private sector, and significantly reduce exposure to radon.”

Specific steps described in the plan include:

  • Incorporating radon testing and mitigation into federal programs,
  • Launching an outreach initiative to educate families about the risks,