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Presentations Available from the 2017 National Radon Training Conference and the International Radon Symposium

National Radon Training Conference and International Radon Symposium:

The joint meeting of the 27th National Radon Training Conference and the International Radon Symposium was held October 2-4, 2017 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The conference was hosted by the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD) and the American Association of Radon Scientists & Technologists (AARST). Over 400 participants from the public and private sector, non-profits and universities attended four days of training, presentations and concurrent workshops.

Presentations made on day one at the joint opening sessions and the CRCPD meeting for days two and three are available in the resources section or by clicking here: Presentations—27th National Radon Training Conference.

Radon Reality: Why the Overlooked Gas Is a Health Hazard

Radon is invisible to the eye and has no odor. And even though it began worrying Americans starting in the 1980s, its mysterious ways seem misunderstood to this day. Yet according to UR Medicine’s Environmental Health Sciences Center, radon gas is second only to cigarette smoke as the leading cause of lung cancer. In the United States, radon is responsible for about 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year.

Two years ago, in a remote Kazakhstan village, residents began falling asleep for days at a time. Tests showed that villagers had an excessive accumulation of fluid in their brains, causing dizziness, inability to stand, fatigue and memory problems. Scientists first thought a virus or bacteria was to blame. Eventually, they concluded that radon from a nearby Soviet-era uranium mine had seeped up to the surface and was poisoning the villagers.

Dangerous Radon Can’t Be Seen or Tasted

How does Radon get into your home? Radon gets in through:

  • Cracks in solid floors.
  • Construction joints.
  • Cracks in walls.
  • Gaps in suspended floors.
  • Gaps around service pipes.
  • Cavities inside walls.
  • The water supply.

Radon is a radioactive gas. It comes from the natural decay of uranium that is found in nearly all soils. It typically moves up through the ground to the air above and into your home through cracks and other holes in the foundation.

Your home traps Radon inside, where it can build up. Any home may have a Radon problem. This means new and old homes, well sealed and drafty homes, and homes with or without basements.

Continue reading here.

Cayuga County Health Department: Radon and Carbon Monoxide Awareness

The days are growing shorter and the nights colder, and it is likely that we are shutting our windows to block out the chill in the air. With winter and the holidays fast approaching, radon and carbon monoxide are probably not the first things on your mind. Unfortunately, these invisible, odorless gases can be a big threat to your health and safety. Luckily, now is the perfect time to take action against them, and the Cayuga County Health Department has the resources available to help.

Here’s How to Get Your Free Radon Test Kit From Weld County

Radon is the No. 1 cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers, and 46 percent of all homes in Colorado are estimated to have high levels, according to Weld County public health officials.

With funding from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, the Weld County Department of Public Health and Environment is offering free radon test kits to any Weld resident — limit one per household.

Read more here.

Danbury Offering Free Radon Testing to Residents

The Danbury Health and Human Services Department will be providing free radon testing kits for Danbury residents on a first come, first serve basis. Free radon testing is part of an ongoing city initiative to work with residents in keeping our community safe and healthy.

Radon in homes is the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Radon is a naturally-occurring radioactive gas that forms when uranium decays is found in rocks, soil and water. The gas is invisible and has no smell, making it an elusive “silent killer” if it’s not specifically tested for. It’s believed that radon gas exposure is responsible for 21,000 lung cancer deaths in the United States each year and the City of Danbury is being proactive in offering free radon testing kits.

Continue reading and find out more here.

EPA Grant Helps Protect Vermont Residents From Radon Exposure

BOSTON - The state of Vermont has received $105,000 that will support efforts to reduce exposure and health risks of radon found in buildings and schools.

The Vermont Department of Health received funds to provide long term test kits for homeowners, and to promote radon-resistant construction techniques in new buildings and renovations. The project will also offer technical assistance for assessing and reducing radon in schools.

The State of Vermont matches the federal award with 40 percent state funding to support actions in the state's approved work plan.

Continue reading here.

National Radon Action Plan Added to RadonLeaders.org

Radonleaders.org now has a section dedicated to the national radon action plan (NRAP). The NRAP is a strategy for saving lives coordinating the actions of three federal departments and nine national organizations.

It highlights progress in addition to describing strategies to reduce radon risk. Click NRAP for more information.

Q&A: “Should I test for radon if the home already has a radon mitigation system?”

When a home already has an active radon mitigation system, is it even worth testing for radon? That's a great question. To answer that, allow me to share a quick story.

Read more here.

Test your home for radon to save money, your life

FAIRBANKS — What did it cost you last time you went to the doctor or dentist? I mean before insurance, Medicare or Medicaid kicked in to bring down the cost. And that may have been just for a routine checkup or work/school annual physical. What if you needed treatment for lung cancer?

The National Cancer Institute reports the cost for the initial treatment of lung cancer in 2010 was $60,553 for women and $60,885 for men. Subsequent annual continued treatment was $8,130 and $7,591 respectively. The problem with this cancer is not only treatment expenditures, but also of survival. According to the America Cancer Society, most lung cancers have spread widely and are in advanced stages when they are first found.

But what if a simple test could alert you to the presence of the second leading cause of lung cancer — radon? Certified professionals will give you a detailed hourly average of radon levels in your home with sophisticated machinery for a couple hundred dollars.