RadonLeaders.org
Skip top navigation

Homeowners

National Radon Action Plan Added to RadonLeaders.org

Radonleaders.org now has a section dedicated to the national radon action plan (NRAP). The NRAP is a strategy for saving lives coordinating the actions of three federal departments and nine national organizations.

It highlights progress in addition to describing strategies to reduce radon risk. Click NRAP for more information.

Q&A: “Should I test for radon if the home already has a radon mitigation system?”

When a home already has an active radon mitigation system, is it even worth testing for radon? That's a great question. To answer that, allow me to share a quick story.

Read more here.

Test your home for radon to save money, your life

FAIRBANKS — What did it cost you last time you went to the doctor or dentist? I mean before insurance, Medicare or Medicaid kicked in to bring down the cost. And that may have been just for a routine checkup or work/school annual physical. What if you needed treatment for lung cancer?

The National Cancer Institute reports the cost for the initial treatment of lung cancer in 2010 was $60,553 for women and $60,885 for men. Subsequent annual continued treatment was $8,130 and $7,591 respectively. The problem with this cancer is not only treatment expenditures, but also of survival. According to the America Cancer Society, most lung cancers have spread widely and are in advanced stages when they are first found.

But what if a simple test could alert you to the presence of the second leading cause of lung cancer — radon? Certified professionals will give you a detailed hourly average of radon levels in your home with sophisticated machinery for a couple hundred dollars.

Radon Could Be A Hidden Threat In Your Home

Realtor Debra Harris had found just what her client wanted.

A duplex on Morgan Street in Throop was remodeled, in move-in condition and at a price she could afford. It checked all her boxes for an investment property. But when the home inspection came back, there was an issue: radon.

A walk through the home wouldn’t show any sign of the odorless, colorless gas that comes from the decay of uranium.

The gas causes lung cancer and is the primary cause of the cancer among people who don’t smoke, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Luzerne and Lackawanna counties, and most counties in Pennsylvania, are in the EPA’s highest zone for highest potential for unhealthy radon levels.

“She was going to have tenants in there, so she definitely needed that addressed,” Harris said.

The seller wound up installing a radon mitigation system to close the deal. As Harris remembers, it cost about $2,500.

High Levels of Radon Found in Some Wells Across Pennsylvania

A new U.S. Geological Survey study has discovered high levels of radon in wells across certain areas of Pennsylvania.

The study, which was conducted in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Departments of Health and Environmental Protection, examined 1,041 well samples and found that 14 percent had radon levels at or above the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed alternative maximum contaminant level of 4,000 picocuries per liter. While the EPA does not currently regulate radon in drinking water, it has proposed this alternative limit for public water supplies in states like Pennsylvania, which has an EPA-approved radon indoor air quality program. For states without an approved program, the EPA has proposed a lower, more protective, maximum contaminant level of 300 picocuries per liter.

Bethel Park students collaborate on radon-testing project

Testing for radon comes with the possibility of producing numbers you don’t exactly want to see.

“Luckily, none of our houses in Bethel were above the actionable levels that the EPA sets,” Neil Armstrong Middle School teacher Joe Rosi said, “which is awesome.”

As part of a project involving collaboration with Bethel Park High School students, Rosi’s fifth-graders conducted tests at their homes, determining if any exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s threshold at which corrective action should be taken. For the record, and for aspiring scientists, that’s four picocuries per liter.

“We have kids who already have abatement systems that exist in their houses,” Rosi said. “They didn’t know what they had them for, and now they know.”

Environmental Protection Warns of High Levels of Radon

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection is warning residents about dangerously high levels of radon.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that may cause up to 21,000 lung cancer deaths a year nationally.

A spokesperson for the agency says he could not share which area is affected.

The agency says at least one home has a radon level 25 times higher than recommended. In a letter sent to one resident, the agency says Pennsylvania generally has "some of the highest radon values in the country."

The state is providing grant money to the American Lung Association in Pennsylvania for free radon tests kits to Hampden Township residents.

Read the original article here

The silent killer: How to protect your home against radon gas

Unbeknownst to millions of families, the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers could be lurking inside their homes.

Exposure to radon, a naturally-occurring radioactive gas, claims an estimated 24,000 lives annually, according to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

Many victims have never smoked a cigarette, according to the American Lung Association.

Radon, a Class-A carcinogen, is the second-leading lung cancer threat overall, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The odorless, tasteless and colorless gas can be found anywhere and can go undetected inside homes for years.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports that one in 15 homes will test at or above the EPA’s action level of four picocuries per liter (pCi/L).

A picocurie is a measure of the rate of radon’s radioactive decay.

State Encourages People to Test Homes for Radon

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI/KIDK) - Radon is the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers in the United States. Idaho is one of the worst states when it comes to high levels of Radon in homes. Which is why the Idaho Dept. of Health and Welfare wants homeowners to test their home for the radioactive gas.

"Everyone should test their home for radon because you do not know if you have high levels unless you do test," said Jim Faust with the dept. of health and welfare.

Currently, tests are only $9.95, normally the costs is about $40 the tests include shipping and a lab analysis. If you are interested in getting your home tested, sign up for a kit at www.radonidaho.org.

Read more here.

High Radon Reading Not Enough to Give Up on a Dream Home

Radon, a radioactive, odorless gas emitted from the soil is surprisingly common in North Carolina, and it is a concern for homeowners or those looking to buy a house.

A home inspection should always include a radon test. Radon can seep into homes and buildings through cracks. Inhaling it has been linked to lung cancer, killing an alarming 21,000 people a year.

If a home test shows high levels of radon, it's not the end of the world. Radon-related deaths are connected with exposure over the course of a lifetime, and Consumer Reports says that exposure can be dealt with.

"You should definitely take it seriously, but you really don't need to walk away from the home. It's actually pretty easy to remove radon, and it's not that expensive," said Paul Hope, Consumer Reports home editor.

Consumer Reports: Is it safe to buy a home with elevated radon level?