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AARST Announces Emerging Risk Reduction Sectors for the 25th InternationalRadon Symposium

AARST Announces Emerging Risk Reduction Sectors for the 25th InternationalRadon Symposium

The 25th International Radon Symposium, sponsored by the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists (AARST), will introduce pre-conference courses and an expanded practicum section at its Springfield, Illinois conference, September 22-25, 2013. The section will concentrate on the emerging risk reduction sectors of multifamily radon testing and mitigation, and radon new construction standards.

Radon,which is the second leading cause of lung cancer and can be deemed the seventh leading cause (after leukemia when separated from lung cancer) of all cancers, is a naturally occurring radioactive gas responsible for over 21,000 lung cancer deaths annually in the United States.

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety and Health Radon Video

The Minnesota Departments of Public Safety and Health are teaming up to bring awareness to the dangers of radon. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Any home, regardless of its size or location, can pull up radon gases from the ground. Many people might be breathing in these deadly gases and never know. We hope this informational video will motivate you to get a radon test kit.

We talked to James Kelly, M.S., Supervisor for the Indoor Air Unit and asked a few questions about the video. In addition, we inquired as to other efforts that have taken place during the 2012 National Radon Action Month. First, we asked how the video came about and requested more information on how he was able to get the Commissioners of Public Safety on camera. His response was the following:

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New Guide for Health Care Providers!

The Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc., has developed Reducing the Risk From Radon: Information and Interventionsa new guide for health care providers titled Reducing the Risk From Radon: Information and Interventions. This guide was designed to furnish health care providers with the information they need to reduce their patients' exposures to radon. Radon is estimated to cause about 21,100 lung cancer deaths per year and is the leading environmental cause of cancer mortality in the United States.
This guide has the latest information on:

Free Radon Kits Available

CHARLEVOIX – The Health Department of Northwest Michigan will offer free radon test kits the week of Jan. 29-Feb. 2 to encourage testing in conjunction with National Radon Action Month.

Free test kits — which include the testing device, along with postage to send the device to a laboratory for laboratory analysis and report — are available at health department offices in Bellaire, Charlevoix, Harbor Springs and Gaylord. Those interested in receiving a kit will need to bring their tax identification number with them to obtain one from the health department. Kits are also available from some hardware stores and home improvement centers — but since these don't always include postage and analysis, the health department recommends reading the packaging carefully.

A Free Way to Check if There's Radon in Your Home

According to a state study, Oneida County is listed as an area testing high in levels of radon.
that's anything above the radioactive measurement of four Picocuries per liter.

"Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas," said Francis Zimmer, the Senior Public Health Sanitarian of the Oneida County Health Department.

Zimmer said it's common to find radon in the soil under your home. But problems arise if the gas comes up through basement.

"It comes in through the cracks and crevices, the joints, the sump pumps. It can build up to higher levels get caught," Zimmer said.

Like anything else, long term exposure can have dangerous effects on your health. Zimmer said having high levels of Radon in your home is comparable to having one X-Ray per day.

"So it's doing damage to your lungs and the problem is lung cancer," Zimmer said.

Dangerous Radon Levels in 4,400 Hudson Valley Homes

Radon, the second leading cause of lung cancer, is found in dangerous levels in homes across the Hudson Valley. An invisible threat, radon at a level above the EPA guideline was found in more than 4,000 homes tested in Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Ulster and Westchester counties in October 2017, according to the New York Health Department.

For example, the state estimates that nearly half the home basements in Dutchess County have higher radon levels than the federal safety guideline, with about one in three homes in Orange, Putnam and Ulster counties so affected, based on short term tests taken in the basement of a home under closed house conditions. About 15-17 percent of home basements in Rockland and Westchester are above the guideline.

Continue reading this article here.

National Radon Action Month

PLANE CRASHES; 400 IOWANS KILLED. This headline would cause an investigation, yet every year approximately 400 Iowans die from radon-induced lung cancer, and few seem to notice.

Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas. It comes from the natural breakdown (radioactive decay) of uranium in the soil left behind by glaciers. Iowa has the highest incidence of radon in the country.

The Surgeon General warns that radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer. According to the Iowa Department of Public Health, five out of seven homes have an unacceptable level of radon.

The average radon concentration in every Iowa county is above the EPA action level of 4.0pCi/L. Since radon levels aren’t constant, every home (no matter the kind of foundation or age of the home) should be tested at least every two years. Testing is the only way to know a radon level. There is no immediate symptom that will alert you to the presence of radon.

Radon Can Be Deadly, But Very Few Nebraskans Test Their Homes

Health officials say Nebraska has one of the worst radon emission rates in the country and while many homes have dangerous radon levels, residents may be oblivious.

Research scientist Dan Tranter says the colorless, odorless, radioactive gas occurs naturally, rising up from the soil — and it can be deadly.

“If you breathe radon for a long period of time, it damages your lungs, which can lead to lung cancer,” Tranter says. “It is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.” Overall, radon is the third-leading cause of cancer in Nebraska, behind smoking and second-hand smoke.

Continue reading here.

Now Is the Time to Test Your Home for Radon Gas

Nearly 40 percent of Idaho homes tested for radon have higher than recommended levels, according to the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare.The naturally occurring radioactive gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer, following smoking.

"Radon is a naturally occurring gas and it's created by the uranium that you would find from the soil, so uranium is normally associated with mountains which is why some states like Colorado would be considered to have more radon," explained Colby Adams, who is the environmental health director for the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare's Division of Public Health. "In Idaho, essentially what has happened over time the radon in the mountains has washed away and eroded and it's settled in different areas of the basin."

Time to Test for Radon

If you haven’t tested your home for radon recently, now’s a good time.

Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that forms naturally when radioactive metals break down in rocks, soil and groundwater. January is National Radon Awareness Month. Winter is a good time to test your home, Teton County Public Health Department response coordinator Rachael Wheeler said.

“The reason winter is a better time to test is because your house is closed up already,” she said. “If you test in the summer, we tell people you need to do things like have all your windows shut, not use your fan and shut your doors as quickly as possible. It’s an easier time to test than the summer months.”

Short-term radon detection kits are available for $10 at Teton County Environmental Health in the public health building at 460 E. Pearl Ave. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.